Andover, Coon Rapids plan for 133rd Avenue project

The Andover City Council March 6 unanimously approved a motion to allow staff to finalize plans and specifications for the reconstruction of 133rd Avenue between Coon Creek and Hanson boulevards this summer.

The cities of Andover and Coon Rapids are working together to reconstruct 133rd Avenue from Coon Creek to Hanson boulevards this summer. Photo by Eric Hagen

The cities of Andover and Coon Rapids are working together to reconstruct 133rd Avenue from Coon Creek to Hanson boulevards this summer. Photo by Eric Hagen

The road follows the Andover-Coon Rapids border, so these neighboring cities are splitting the project cost, which is estimated to be $788,290 at this time. Each city is responsible for $394,145.

Andover and Coon Rapids assess property owners for road projects. While Coon Rapids assesses a flat rate of $1,575 per lot, Andover typically assesses 25 percent of project costs. However, Andover will only assess $1,500 per lot in this case because only two Andover property owners have a 133rd Avenue address within this project area. Coon Rapids only has three property owners who will be assessed for this project. Other Andover and Coon Rapids homes along 133rd Avenue front on adjacent streets.

The Andover council had signed off on the joint powers agreement with Coon Rapids at its Feb. 21 meeting. A portion of the March 6 council meeting was set aside for a public hearing. Neither of the two Andover property owners to be assessed spoke up.

According to Andover City Engineer and Public Works Superintendent David Berkowitz, $1,500 is similar to assessment amounts on similar Andover projects in urban areas.

For example, property owners in the East Brook Terrace & Auditors Subdivision 137 of Andover were each assessed $1,192.77 for a 2011 project. Earlier in 2011, Berkowitz had estimated the assessment would be $1,600 per lot, but the city received excellent bids.

The city is currently estimating the interest rate for the assessment repayments at 5.5 percent, but this rate has typically dropped in recent years once final assessments were determined. Assuming the rate stays at 5.5 percent and the assessment stays at $1,500, Berkowitz said the annual payment would be $199 for someone taking all 10 years to pay off the assessment.

An assessed property owner could pay off the full amount, without interest, within one month of the assessment hearing, which is planned for July. The bid will be awarded to a contractor in May and work with take place between late May and mid July, according to Berkowitz.

The reason this road is getting reconstructed now is because it has show signs of fatigue, including cracks. The cities have patched up the road, but it has got to the point where reconstruction is necessary, according to Berkowitz.

Eric Hagen is at eric.hagen@ecm-inc.com

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