Sand storage allowed on property that has tires

The Andover City Council unanimously granted permission to a property owner to temporarily store 7,000 cubic yards of sand on his property east of Hanson Boulevard.

The Andover City Council in January granted Dennis Kuiken approval to store 11,000 cubic yards of shredded tires on his property for the Anoka County upcoming project to reconstruct Hanson Boulevard from 161st to 181st avenues. The county will be digging up sand from the old road base before putting in the tires. The council Tuesday night granted approval for the temporary storage of 7,000 cubic yards of sand. Photo by Eric Hagen

The Andover City Council in January granted Dennis Kuiken approval to store 11,000 cubic yards of shredded tires on his property for the Anoka County upcoming project to reconstruct Hanson Boulevard from 161st to 181st avenues. The county will be digging up sand from the old road base before putting in the tires. The council Tuesday night granted approval for the temporary storage of 7,000 cubic yards of sand. Photo by Eric Hagen

“I have no problem with sand in Andover,” Councilmember Julie Trude said. “It’s not like the tires.”

Dennis Kuiken is the same property owner who was granted permission by the council in January to store 11,000 cubic yards of shredded tires on his land north of 161st Avenue and east of Hanson Boulevard.

The Anoka County Highway Department wants to place the shredded tires below a reconstructed Hanson Boulevard between 161st and 181st avenues this spring. The city is demanding the tires be out of sight by July 1.

The sand will come from the old road base the county digs up before putting in the tires, according to City Planner Courtney Bednarz.

The council was not pleased with the tire storage because nobody gave the city a heads up that the tires would be stored there, and the city was concerned about the fire and environmental hazards. The tires were divided into multiple piles and a temporary chain link fence surrounds them. Trude voted to deny the storage permit.

Storing sand was not as heavily debated as the shredded tires, but the city placed about a dozen conditions on its agreement with Kuiken to ensure the sand is gone as soon as possible.

For starters, the sand would be stored much farther away from Hanson Boulevard than the tires, according to a map Kuiken showed the council. Bednarz said the area is almost entirely surrounded by trees and is where Kuiken once stored black dirt excavated from his property.

Kuiken’s goal is to use the sand to create a farm road that would access a landlocked 40-acre parcel he owns and connect with Ward Lake Drive.

Bednarz said Kuiken needs city approval for this access before he builds the dirt road.

According to Bednarz, the Coon Creek Watershed District would have to approve this proposal because the road goes through the flood plain.

The city is requiring Kuiken to show written approval from the watershed district by Sept. 28. Should he receive this approval, he will have until the end of September 2013 to remove all sand.

Kuiken said he would work on the road during the winter.

If the watershed district does not approve the road by Sept. 28, Bednarz said Kuiken has one month to remove all sand.

Kuiken said he would sell the sand and resurface the dirt roads he already has.

“I don’t think it will be a problem getting rid of it in the time frame,” Kuiken told the Andover Planning Commission at its April 10 meeting.

The sand would be transported in trucks over an area that has a buried gas line, so the city is requiring Kuiken to have a berm for the trucks to travel over. He must notify the gas company before he plans to transport any material through this area.

Eric Hagen is at eric.hagen@ecm-inc.com


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