Cub Scouts have fun, learn lessons on a sunny Saturday

Over 200 Cub Scouts from the Three Rivers District area ventured out to the Rum River Scout Camp in Ramsey April 14 for a day of fun and education.

Nicholas Donner, 8, of Andover goes through the obstacle course set up at the Rum River Scout Camp in Ramsey, which hosted the Three Rivers District Cub Scouts Spring Fling April 14. Photo by Eric Hagen

Nicholas Donner, 8, of Andover goes through the obstacle course set up at the Rum River Scout Camp in Ramsey, which hosted the Three Rivers District Cub Scouts Spring Fling April 14. Photo by Eric Hagen

The 212 Cub Scouts who attended the district’s spring fling event was a lot higher number than at the 2011 spring fling, according to District Director Jamie Lamprecht. The snow still on the ground at that point in 2011 probably hindered attendance, Lamprecht said.

Fortunately for these young Scouts, the sun was shining and the temperature was in the low 70s. It was warm enough that a lot of the kids enjoyed getting soaked by water spouting from two-liter plastic bottles shooting into the clear blue sky.

Later that evening and into Sunday, storms rolled into the area. Timing was on the side of the Cub Scouts this year.

The spring fling was more about getting outdoors, however. Aaron Rothstein refreshed Scouts on the importance of leaving no trace behind in the wilderness. This is an important message ingrained into Scouts’ minds by their parents and adult supervisors.

The goal is to make it look like nobody was at a camp site or meeting hall. This means picking up wrappers and trash and putting things back the way they found them.

Rothstein also showed the importance of grass by pouring water in two long containers. One contained dirt and the other had dirt with a cover of grass. The container with grass soaked in the water and cleaned it much better than the container of dirt, which the water quickly ran through.

The bottle rockets was a fun lesson on the impact of air pressure. They also learned about applied physics by hitting a catapult to send a stuffed frog they created sailing through the air.

Instructors at the archery and BB gun firing ranges taught the young Scouts important safety lessons.

They even got an out-of-water lesson on how to cast a fishing line.

Linda Paquette of Andover has a son in Boy Scouts, but still enjoys helping out the younger Cub Scouts. The boys can first get involved in kindergarten as Lion Cubs. The Scouts advance through different ranks — Tiger Cub, Wolf, Bear, Webelos and Arrow of Light — before becoming a Boy Scout. Boys have typically completed the fifth grade by the time they move onto Boy Scouts.

“I want kids to have other things other than video games to play with,” Paquette said. “This makes learning fun.”

Eric Hagen is at eric.hagen@ecm-inc.com


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