Whispering Pines presents art at open house

Whispering Pines Assisted Living residents proudly displayed their Anoka County Fair arts and crafts entries at an open house at the Elms house in Anoka July 31.

Resident Kasper Messer displays the two colored pictures he exhibited at the fair. Messer received second-place ribbons for both pictures.

Resident Kasper Messer displays the two colored pictures he exhibited at the fair. Messer received second-place ribbons for both pictures.Photo by Bethany Kemming

Residents from six of the seven Whispering Pines houses submitted entries to the fair, with a total of 20 residents exhibiting 26 items. Whispering Pines Activities Director Trudy Blake said many residents went to the fair and got to see their art.

“The shelf was just full of our things… that’s really good to see, pretty soon we’ll have half the room filled,” Blake told residents at the open house.

Residents entered their artwork into several categories, including cross-stitch, painting, craft kit, woodwork and more, according to Blake. She was appreciative that the Anoka County Fair also awarded several small monetary prizes to first-, second- and third-place winners from Whispering Pines. Those who entered their artwork but did not place still received a participation ribbon.

While residents made most of the art throughout the year during arts and crafts time at Whispering Pines, Blake said several residents make art on their own for fun.

Resident Cynthia Raether sews and does cross-stitch. She won a second-place ribbon for a cross-stitch apron at the fair and a first-place ribbon for two sock monkeys that she made.

For resident Becky Johnson, all she needed to create art was a block of wood. She portrayed a fairy tale by painting a serpent, fisherman and a treasure chest on the wood. She used the knots in the wood to represent clouds. Johnson got the wood from her brother who is a carpenter.

“I said that it’s kind of perfect for a picture I have in mind,” she said.

Johnson won second-place ribbons for the serpent painting and a “controversial” peacock painting.

“It’s either a peacock or a turkey, depends on which way you look at it,” Blake said with a laugh.

Bethany Kemming is at bethany.kemming@ecm-inc.com


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