Andover council revises plat for housing development

The Andover City Council took another step toward getting more homes developed at the Parkside at Andover Station housing development in Andover Station North.

In addition to revising the plat of the Parkside at Andover Station to reflect the plan for Capstone Homes to develop 35 single-family homes instead of more eight-plexes and detached townhomes, the Andover City Council Sept. 18 also vacated a conservation easement that protected this row of trees because many could be lost when the new homes go in. Photo by Eric Hagen

In addition to revising the plat of the Parkside at Andover Station to reflect the plan for Capstone Homes to develop 35 single-family homes instead of more eight-plexes and detached townhomes, the Andover City Council Sept. 18 also vacated a conservation easement that protected this row of trees because many could be lost when the new homes go in. Photo by Eric Hagen

The council Sept. 18 unanimously approved a final plat for the housing development, which is generally located north of Bunker Lake Boulevard and west of Linnet Street.

The Parkside at Andover Station housing development just off Jay Street already has three eight-plexes, one four-plex and two single-family homes that Bruggeman Homes built. Capstone Homes of Ramsey will be looking to construct 35 additional single-family homes.

According to City Administrator Jim Dickinson, Capstone Homes now owns two single-family lots on which Bruggeman Homes built. The city of Andover owns the remaining land, but the Andover Economic Development Authority and Capstone Homes have a signed agreement that requires Capstone Homes to keep purchasing lots until the whole 20 acres of vacant land are purchased.

“It’s pretty exciting to see this come to fruition,” Dickinson said.

This property was once set aside for three more eight-plexes and 33 detached townhomes, but the consensus reached was townhomes are not as marketable as single-family homes at this time, Dickinson and Capstone Homes Owner Ben Minks previously told ABC Newspapers.

Minks said people had turned to townhouses because of the lower prices, but lower lot prices have made single-family homes more affordable. Single-family homes also historically have a better re-sale value, he said.

“It would sit for several years if you tried to look at detached townhomes and eight-plexes,” Dave Carlberg, city community development director, told the Andover Planning and Zoning Commission at its Sept. 11 meeting. “Single-family is the market to move this project.”

Much of the tall row of trees that provided a natural screening between Parkside and single-family homes in a neighborhood to the west could be lost due to these 35 new single-family homes being put in Parkside, according to city staff.

The city had created a conservation easement to save the trees, but the council vacated this easement Sept. 18 because many trees will be lost. Carlberg said Capstone Homes will save as many trees as possible. It would be required to have two trees per lot to meet the city’s requirement, so new trees would be planted.

Eight guest parking spaces next to the trees that could have been used by the future eight-plexes and detached townhomes will be removed now that the single-family homes are the new plan. Dickinson said the approximately 1,100 square-foot homes would have a three-car garage.

The streets are already in place, so no new road construction is needed, Carlberg said. However, there would need to be some utility modifications underground to accommodate the single-family homes where the eight-plexes were planned.

When discussing the plat, Councilmember Julie Trude questioned the placement of a lot on the curve of the road where Martin Street turns into 140th Avenue. City Engineer and Public Works Director David Berkowitz said the driveway will be placed as far east as possible on its lot to help with visibility.

According to Minks, Capstone Homes is planning to build split-level entry homes that will have three bedrooms, two bathrooms and include some high-level amenities like hardwood floors in areas of the house like the kitchen and dining room and granite counter tops. These houses would be marketed around $200,000, he said.

Carlberg said the developer is planning three styles of homes and each will have a number of architectural and color options available to prevent repetition.

Nothing to do with Walmart

Just south of these homes will be the new Walmart on the former Pov’s Sports Bar site.

Carlberg told the Planning and Zoning Commission Sept. 11 that he did receive some e-mails and phone calls inquiring if this new project area had anything to do with Walmart.

“When they found out this had nothing to do with Walmart, that it was a residential housing project, they were fine with the project,” Carlberg said.

No other residents spoke up when the commission had a Sept. 11 public hearing on the revised plat and the council had a public hearing on the vacation of the conservation easement.

Brad Povlitzki previously told ABC Newspapers that Walmart is looking to purchase about 20 acres from him. Povlitzki is retaining a six-acre parcel northwest of this 20 acres and near this Capstone Homes development area. Although this six-acres is now zoned general business, Carlberg said this property is better suited for residential.

Carlberg said it could be possible for a road to be extended from Capstone’s project area to the six-acre parcel and end the road in a cul-de-sac. This way there would be no road connection between these neighborhoods and Walmart, whose customers would use Jay Street and Bunker Lake Boulevard to access the store.

There are no development proposals for this six-acre property at this time, however.

Eric Hagen is at eric.hagen@ecm-inc.com


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