Outdoors column: Bulk up for fall largemouth

It’s getting a little late but there is still some really good bassin’ to be had. Big bass in particular, like those pushing five and maybe six pounds plus.

It’s getting late, but there’s still some good bassing to be had.

It’s getting late, but there’s still some good bassing to be had.

Right now largemouth are chowing down big time and aren’t all that hard to catch if you’re in the right place at the right time.

With the right time already taken care of, all that remains is the where and that isn’t all that hard to figure out.

On most of our good bass lakes green weeds are where it’s at, especially cabbage and coontail. Quick breaks or drop-offs on the deep edge of a weed bed also helps to concentrate fish and is where you’re likely to find the greenest growing weeds. Going green is really good when it comes to finding big schools of fall largies.

How you work a weedbed will depend on just how dense the weeds are and how much room you have over the top. If there’s room you can try casting a spinnerbait like Northland Tackle’s Super Stainless Reed Runner and slowly working it back and letting it get down and bump into the tops of the weeds.

You can work the tandem spinner bait nice and slow but you can back it down even more by adding a plastic trailer like an Impulse Brush Beaver.

As you bring it back; try and feel and imagine what’s going on and rear back and set the hook on anything that feels different.

To help with the feel a good graphite rod like the seven foot, one inch medium Omen casting rod from 13Fishing can make a real difference. The medium action rod has plenty of backbone to set a hook but still provides the ultimate in feel.

You should also work the deep edge of the deepest growing weeds and this is where a jig like the Northland Jungle Jig tipped with a Brush Beaver comes in handy.

Even with the colder water temps of fall you can still catch fish on plastic worms etc., but a jig and creature combo can mean bigger fish and bigger is better.

The Jungle Jig is designed to be weedless and can be cast into the heavy stuff and still come out clean. When you work it back make sure you get it to the bottom, especially to the base of the weeds.

When a big bass inhales it you might feel the thump or you might just see your line moving off or tightening up. Whatever the case; it’s time to give ‘em some steel and set the hook.

When you do hook up with a good fish be sure to give the area some extra time even if things slow down a bit. Good spots typically hold a lot of fish but they might not all be active at the same time. Instead, you’re likely to find a few that turn on and move up or out to the edges of the weeds where they can be readily caught – and oh man, I am so ready.

See you on the water.

Ron Anlauf is a frequent contributer to the Outdoors page.

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