Adams Elementary science fair had record number of projects

Adams Elementary School’s annual science fair Jan. 22 drew the most entries in its three-year history.

A table of magnets was set up by Mad Science of Minnesota for kids to explore at the Adams Elementary School science fair Jan. 22. Watched by his mother, Charlene Gerard, first-grader Joseph Gerard checks out a magnet. He recently got a magnet kit at home, his mother said.

A table of magnets was set up by Mad Science of Minnesota for kids to explore at the Adams Elementary School science fair Jan. 22. Watched by his mother, Charlene Gerard, first-grader Joseph Gerard checks out a magnet. He recently got a magnet kit at home, his mother said.

There were 162 students that entered this year’s science fair, which is open to kindergarten through fifth-grade students.

That compares with 125 that took part in the 2012 science fair, according to Carrie Genser, third-grade teacher and science fair coordinator.

“Word got out,” Genser said.

“Kids were excited about conducting experiments.”

In the evening, parents and families were able to view the science fair projects in the gymnasium on the “science gallery walk.”

In addition, the Mad Science of Minnesota organization brought two interactive scientific displays for children to explore – one involved magnets and the other was a mineral hunt.

Students set up their projects in the gymnasium the morning of Jan. 22 where they met with coaches who talked with them about their projects, Genser said.

The coaches were staff members and parents, 14 of them, she said.

There was no judging, Genser said.

All the students that took part received a certificate and medallion, which were presented at the school’s annual academic celebration Jan. 24 at Coon Rapids High School.

Students worked on their science projects at home for about six weeks in tandem with the school’s “I Love to Read” program, according to Genser.

“Entering the science fair was optional,” Genser said.

Students chose their own science fair projects, but they were given some possible ideas, she said.

They had to come up with a scientific question to answer, identify hypotheses, do experiments and come to a conclusion, Genser said.

The most entries were from fifth-graders, who are in their last year at Adams before heading off to middle school.

“There were 75 fifth-graders taking part,” Genser said.

Peter Bodley is at peter.bodley@ecm-inc.com

up arrow