McKinley students discover the scientist inside

It’s not rocket science, but when geologists and doctors, chemists, pilots and engineers set up shop Jan. 31 at McKinley Elementary School, students discovered the scientist inside.

University of Minnesota medical student Emily Wolff describes to students the ins and outs of the heart. Also on display in the medical science room during McKinely Family Science Night were models of the liver, kidney, lungs and other organs. Photo by Sue Austreng
University of Minnesota medical student Emily Wolff describes to students the ins and outs of the heart. Also on display in the medical science room during McKinely Family Science Night were models of the liver, kidney, lungs and other organs. Photo by Sue Austreng

Together with parents and siblings, McKinley kids got up close and personal with science during McKinley Family Science Night.

Under the direction of 3M’s Visiting Wizards, University of Minnesota medical students and volunteers from the Minnesota Space Consortium, the Ham Lake RCA (Remote Control Aircraft) Club, Medtronic, Connexus and the Anoka County Library, budding scientists explored rocks and minerals, anatomy and aircraft – all the while opening their eyes to marvels as yet unknown to their evolving scientific minds.

“This is a great night. So much fun for everyone, so many lessons, so much discovery,” said Amy Rigemo, organizer of the event for McKinley.

“There’s more way cool science at our McKinley homepage.”

Rigemo encouraged the curious to log on and check out www.anoka.k12.mn.us/mckinley. Click on “Way Cool Science Stuff” on the navigation bar on the left.

Dozens of curious budding scientists witnessed marvels presented on stage by 3M Visiting Wizards during McKinley Elementary School Family Science Night Jan. 31. Joey DeLaria, a third-grader at McKinley and an experienced remote control helicopter pilot, examines the intricacies of a remote control plane under construction. Third-grader Logan Vessels learns the finer points of remote control piloting from parent volunteer Tom Larose (not pictured) Luke Studer delicately extracts a bone plate from a life-sized “operation” model while visiting the medical science room during McKinley Family Science Night. University of Minnesota medical student Emily Wolff describes to students the ins and outs of the heart. Also on display in the medical science room during McKinely Family Science Night were models of the liver, kidney, lungs and other organs. Seth Winge and Elaina Konyuk get set to peer into the microscope when they visited the project microscope room during McKinley Family Science Night Jan. 31. Dr. Bob shows kids how to make their own Super Balls in the mad science room, a fan favorite among McKinley Family Science Night attractions. Photos by Sue Austreng Willa Langemo and Skyler Winge listen as University of Minnesota NASA program volunteer James Flaten describes the science of rocketry.
<
>
University of Minnesota medical student Emily Wolff describes to students the ins and outs of the heart. Also on display in the medical science room during McKinely Family Science Night were models of the liver, kidney, lungs and other organs.

Sue Austreng is at [email protected]