Boy Scout breakfast brings together the community

For a brief time, the annual Boy Scouts breakfast took people on an adventure in the state parks.

Guest speaker photographer Doug Ohman encouraged everyone to get out and explore the state parks and shared stories of his adventures in the park system. Photo by Tammy Sakry

Guest speaker photographer Doug Ohman encouraged everyone to get out and explore the state parks and shared stories of his adventures in the park system. Photo by Tammy Sakry

Photographer Doug Ohman was the featured speaker at the breakfast Feb. 21, which was a fund-raiser for the Three Rivers District.

“We raised $18,756 for Scouting in Anoka and Isanti counties this morning,” said Jamie Lamprecht, Three Rivers District director.

The 152 people who came to the breakfast helped the Scouts with their community campaign kick off, which helps fund the programs, he said.

In 2012, more than 25,000 youth in Anoka County benefited from the Scouting programs, said Dr. Roger Giroux, district chairman.

Last year, 75 boys went on to become Eagle Scouts. 630 youth attended one of the Scouts’ summer camps as did more than 600 Cub Scouts, he said.

“We are fortunate to have such a great track record for Scouting and we are proud to share all the resources Scouting has,” Giroux said.

It is clear that Scouting is also a career and leadership development program, he said.

With the help of donations, the Scouts are looking to increasing the participation this year, Giroux said.

Growing up in Anoka County, Ohman said he remembers a lot of invitations to join the Scouts.

But his dad was a pastor and he needed to join the church group, which was similar to Scouts, he said.

“Scouting is about the great outdoors,” Ohman said.

During his 20-minute presentation, Ohman took the crowd on a photographic tour of Itasca, Fort Ridgely, Savanna Portage and Split Rock Light House state parks.

Some people think if they have been to one state park, they have been to all of them. They have not, said Ohman, who has done the photography work for a series of Minnesota history books.

There is a lot of history in each park and each park offers something different, he said.

Fort Ridgely was built in the 1850s without protective walls and it was one of the reasons it was attacked twice during the war with the Dakota Indians, Ohman said.

Savanna offers a six-mile portage used by voyageurs, he said.

Depending on which state park the people visit, they can see buffalo, different species of birds and wildlife, Ohman said.

“Get out and enjoy the beauty of Minnesota and the unique things offered by each state park,” he said.

“You never know what you will find.”

Tammy Sakry is at tammy.sakry@ecm-inc.com

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