Governor’s revised budget less bold and less controversial

by T.W. Budig
ECM Capitol reporter
Democrats lauded Gov. Mark Dayton’s proposed state budget as the boldest seen in decades.

But Dayton acknowledged his revamped $38 billion budget, released Thursday (March 14) is less adventurous than the budget he proposed originally.“It’s not as bold as it was before,” the Democratic governor said, smiling.

Dayton’s budget retains an income tax increase for the top 2 percent of wage earners to gain $1 billion — affecting about 54,000 Minnesotans, according to the administration. Dayton again shook two fingers to indicate the percent of taxpayers affected by the tax-the-rich income tax proposal.

“It’s very well off,” Dayton said of the income levels of taxpayers whom the fourth-tier would embrace.

According to the administration, the average taxable income of single filer in the bracket is $428,000. The average fourth-tier taxable income for married filers is $671,000. According to the administration, the number of taxpayers falling into fourth-tier bracket in Anoka County is 1,377; Chisago, 166; Dakota, 3,297; Hennepin, 17,069; Houston, 71; Isanti, 99; Mille Lacs, 54; Morrison, 74; Ramsey, 3,649; Sherburne, 290.

Dayton jettisoned his sales tax expansion proposal, which extended the sales tax to clothing, business-to-business transactions and many other products and services not now subject to the tax. The governor attributed his retreat on the $2 billion tax expansion to lack of support in the Legislature and public.

Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton released his supplemental state budget on Thursday (March 14). While increasing taxes on wealthier Minnesotans, the governor drops his sales tax expansion proposal. (Photo by T.W. Budig)

Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton released his revised state budget on Thursday (March 14). While increasing taxes on wealthier Minnesotans, the governor drops his sales tax expansion proposal. (Photo by T.W. Budig)

Dayton, though, keeps his quarter-cent, metro-wide sales tax proposal for transit.

“I don’t know the answer to that,” he said when asked whether a quarter-cent increase is big enough.

The governor, urged by Health Commissioner Edward Ehlinger and others, kept his proposed 94-cent-per-pack cigarette tax increase — cost is a driving factor getting people to quit and teens not to start, he said — and looks to closing some $323 million in perceived business tax loopholes.

Dayton, too, citing a belief in tax fairness, keeps the so-called snowbird provision. Under it, non-residents living in Minnesota for two to six months would be subject to the income tax. Now, if you live in Minnesota for less than six months, you are not subject to the income tax. But the governor concedes the prospects of getting the provision through the legislature aren’t good.

One high-profile provision dropped in the governor’s reworked budget is a property-tax rebate of up to $500.

“I think that was always going to happen,” Senate Majority Leader Tom Bakk, DFL-Cook, said of the income tax increase on the wealthy.

Property tax relief is very important to the Senate, Bakk said. Senators are hoping to do something more in that area, he said.

Republican Senate Minority Leader David Hann, R-Eden Prairie, argued the governor's budget was an example of government gone wild. (Photo by T.W. Budig)

Republican Senate Minority Leader David Hann, R-Eden Prairie, argued the governor’s budget was an example of government “gone wild.” (Photo by T.W. Budig)

Republican leaders argued that job creation and a brightening economy make raising taxes unnecessary.

“(It’s) government gone wild down here,” Senate Minority Leader David Hann, R-Eden Prairie, quipped, standing outside the Governor’s Office. The governor is raising $1.8 billion to solve a $627 million budge deficit, he said.

But Dayton insisted that people who don’t want any tax increase need to specify exactly where they propose to cut the budget.

“I challenge them,” he said.

Minority Leader Kurt Daudt, R-Crown, spoke of finding efficiencies and then letting the economy work.

Dayton indicated that he will be releasing a $750 million bonding bill within a few weeks. His intention is to have another $750 million bonding bill next year, he indicated.

Tim Budig can be reached at tim.budig@ecm-inc.com.

Comments Closed

up arrow
No Thanks