Easter bunny visits snow-covered George Green Park

The Anoka Women of Today hosted its annual Easter egg hunt and party March 23 at George Green Park.

A giant Easter bunny greets families eager to search a snow-covered George Green Park for Easter eggs during the March 23 egg hunt and party presented by the Anoka Women of Today.Photo by Sue Austreng
A giant Easter bunny greets families eager to search a snow-covered George Green Park for Easter eggs during the March 23 egg hunt and party presented by the Anoka Women of Today.Photo by Sue Austreng

More than six dozen children and their families searched the snow-covered park, gathering plastic Easter eggs filled with candy and prize tickets.

The tickets could be exchanged for toys, crayons, costume jewelry, games, pencils and more.

Inside the Anoka Senior Center building children were invited to plant flower seeds, play table games, participate in a cake walk, spin the wheel for a candy sucker and have pictures taken with the Easter bunny.

The event was made possible by donations from local businesses and funded by money raised by the Women of Today.

“This is such a fun day,” said Anoka Women of Today President Sharri Brecto. “The kids love it, we love it. Every year this is a great time. Of course, we don’t always have six inches of snow on the ground, but that makes it even more fun.”

Phoebe Handy holds a fistful of prize tickets – 24 to be exact – and gets ready to exchange them for toys, crayons, pencils and more. Paige Carlson gives the wheel a spin as she enjoys Anoka Women of Today’s annual Easter egg hunt and party. Jakob Frost plants a pansy during Anoka Women of Today’s annual Easter egg hunt and party at George Green Park. Children scramble through a snowy George Green Park, harvesting colorful eggs scattered on the ground and plucking a few from the grills rooted there. Little Benjamin Macaraig takes a tumble as he hunts for eggs scattered about George Green Park.
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Children scramble through a snowy George Green Park, harvesting colorful eggs scattered on the ground and plucking a few from the grills rooted there.

Sue Austreng is at [email protected]