District 11 video students are movie makers

Video students from Blaine, Coon Rapids and Andover high schools recently participated in a unique movie-making adventure.

April 23, the schools’ video arts one and two classes — 53 students in all — traveled to the Minneapolis Community and Technical College to make a movie with MCTC’s Cinema Division.

Video students from Blaine, Coon Rapids and Andover high schools prepare to start filming their movie, “3 Uses of a Pencil,” while visiting Minneapolis Community and Technical College April 23. Submitted photo

Video students from Blaine, Coon Rapids and Andover high schools prepare to start filming their movie, “3 Uses of a Pencil,” while visiting Minneapolis Community and Technical College April 23. Submitted photo

The film, titled “3 Uses of a Pencil,” has a tentative completion date of May 29. It was written, filmed, produced and performed by Anoka-Hennepin students and staff, according to Blaine High School art teacher Kim Blevins.

She said students from the three high schools split into different units, with each group filming for the four hours everyone was at the college.

“My hope is that students now realize how much work and how many people it takes to make even a short film a reality,” Blevins said.

All told, each film unit had a director, as well as first camera, second camera, sound, lighting and script/continuity positions. And that doesn’t count the actors and actresses who were also Anoka-Hennepin students, Blevins said.

The movie was written by Blaine High School senior Michael Voit, who, according to Belvins, is already an award-winning student-writer and film-maker.

Last year, Voit, a Perpich Playwright Scholar, made a movie called “Bay 3,” which received a superior ranking at the State Thespian Festival. He also won a Gold Scholastic Art Award in Film and Video in 2012, Blevins said.

It took more than two months for her and her art teacher colleagues — Sarah Hjelmberg (CRHS) and Bree Nieland (ANDHS) — to produce the movie after it was written, but it took just four hours to film the three pieces, according to Blevins.

“The film really could not have been made without the help of the MCTC Cinema Division, Professor Adam Olson and advanced cinema students serving as mentors in the process,” Blevins said.

“MCTC is one of the best film programs in the state and it really shows. They really took the time to help our students.”

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