‘Mythological Geographies’ at Banfill challenge viewers’ notions

Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts’ newest exhibit “Mythical Geographies” visually explores paths via paintings and sculptures.

“Dr. Evermore’s Sculpture Garden,” oil on linen by Molly Yergens  Photo submitted

“Dr. Evermore’s Sculpture Garden,” oil on linen by Molly Yergens Photo submitted

The show, which opens June 29 and runs through August 3, features the new works of artists Brandon Kuehn and Molly Yergens.

The pair present landscapes as a site of spiritual enlightenment and a mythological vessel.

“Kuehn and Yergens construct mythical geographies that are chronicles of experience and transformation … ,” according to a written statement.

Kuehn’s paintings defy preconceived notions of traditional landscapes and forces the viewer to question what he is seeing and to create his own narrative.

An adjunct professor of art at Augsburg College of Minneapolis and an adjunct professor of design at Brown College of Mendota Heights, Kuehn has exhibited his works both locally and nationally. He holds a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Minnesota and a master of fine arts degree from the Art Institute of Boston, Lesley University.

His most recent works have appeared at The Waters of Superior in Duluth and at Terzian Gallery in Park City, Utah.

Yergens’ sculptures feature fragmented constructs of painted planes, inviting the eye to wander through a montage of abstract passages and to explore spatial relationships.

Yergens is a Fargo, N.D. native. She holds a bachelor of fine arts degree in painting from the Rhode Island School of Design. She later returned to the Midwest and completed her art education credentials at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. She earned her master of fine arts degree also from the Art Institute of Boston, Lesley University.

Yergens has traveled extensively and incorporates her paintings and drawings into her adventures. In 2011, she participated in a five-week painting expedition above the Arctic Circle in northern Norway. There, she produced a series of paintings, which were exhibited at Hamarøy Gallery.

Yergens has worked as a visual arts instructor at a college prep school in Faribault for the last six years. She runs a vibrant studio practice on the school’s campus.

Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts presents “Mythical Geographies: Referencing Landscape Through Painting and Sculpture.” Featuring the new works of artists Brandon Kuehn and Molly Yergens. June 29-August 3. Opening reception June 29, 6-8 p.m. Free. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday. 6666 East River Road, Fridley. For more information, visit www.banfill-locke.org or call the center at 763-574-1850.

Elyse Kaner is at elyse.kaner@ecm-inc.com

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