Children learn how to be smart about safety

A day-long event at Coon Rapids Dam Regional Park July 20 was all about kids being smart about safety and having fun at the same time.

Coon Rapids Police Officer Bryan Platz, who is spearheading the Heart Safe program in Coon Rapids, showed children the correct way to perform cardio pulmonary resuscitation on a heart attack victim. Heart Safe Coon Rapids is a grass roots effort whose goal of the program is to educate the community about sudden cardiac arrest and help train the public in CPR and AED use.

Coon Rapids Police Officer Bryan Platz, who is spearheading the Heart Safe program in Coon Rapids, showed children the correct way to perform cardio pulmonary resuscitation on a heart attack victim. Heart Safe Coon Rapids is a grass roots effort whose goal of the program is to educate the community about sudden cardiac arrest and help train the public in CPR and AED use.

Cub Scout Pack 419, Coon Rapids, hosted a Smart Kids program at the regional park for the third year; last year it was called a safety awareness event.

More than 100 children ages six to 12 attended the event billed as a “fun filled day of safety.”

While Smart Kids was hosted by a Cub Scout pack, which draws its members from the Eisenhower and Sand Creek elementary schools’ area, the event was open to all kids in the community, according to Cubmaster Matthew Johnson.

“It was all about safety, kids being safe,” Johnson said.

The children were divided into groups and rotated through eight different stations with a break for lunch.

Topics and presentations included bullying, childhood obesity, physical fitness, cardio pulmonary resuscitation, first aid, fire safety in the home, electrical safety, Internet safety and bike safety, the latter in the form of a bike rodeo.

Presenters included Allina Health Emergency Medical Services, Allina Wellness Van, Mercy Hospital, Coon Rapids fire and police departments, Connexus Energy, Heart Safe Coon Rapids and Anoka County Community Health Department.

In addition, there were games with an emphasis on physical fitness and during lunch, a dunk tank.

According to Johnson, the kids safety event has “blossomed” since the Cub Scout pack launched it three years ago.

“We want kids to have a safe summer and not get injured,” said Johnson, a paramedic with Allina by profession.

Donations from various organizations and businesses totaled $3,300 to not only cover the expenses of the event but provide some prizes as well, he said.

Cub Scout Pack 419 currently has 35 members, Johnson said.

Peter Bodley is at peter.bodley@ecm-inc.com

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