Epiphany Dinner Theater presents ‘In the Mood’

The swinging sounds of the bugle boys and playful antics of Abbott and Costello, George Burns and Gracie Allen grace the stage when Epiphany Dinner Theatre presents “In the Mood.”

A cast of more than 70 members – ages 10-80 – get “In the Mood” and take the stage for Church of the Epiphany’s Dinner Theatre, opening Nov. 14. Photo by BettyJean Photography

A cast of more than 70 members – ages 10-80 – get “In the Mood” and take the stage for Church of the Epiphany’s Dinner Theatre, opening Nov. 14. Photo by BettyJean Photography

The show opens 7 p.m. Nov. 14 with family night in the theater with tickets $6 for adults and $4 for students and seniors and continues with a dinner and show performance Nov. 15, with adult tickets at $30 and students and seniors $27.

A 1 p.m. dessert and show is on Nov. 16 with adult tickets $15 and students and seniors $12.

Then from 5-10 p.m. Nov. 16 there will a gala and live auction complete with dinner theater performance. Tickets are $60 for adults and seniors.

“Each year I come up with a theme, and put music and script together for that theme. This year is the big band era,” said director Liz Grefsheim.

“The music of this era has a lot of tight harmonies so that has been fun as we work together to sing that music.”

According to Grefsheim, a playlist of songs includes “In the Mood,” “It Don’t Mean a Thing if it Ain’t Got That Swing,” “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy,” “Puttin’ on the Ritz” and many more favorite songs from the big band era.

Dialogue segments from Abbott and Costello and George Burns and Gracie Allen will also be part of the “In the Mood” entertainment.

With large group numbers, as well as solos and duets, the show is sure to entertain, Grefsheim said.

“Another unique thing is that both of our priests will be seen on stage in the show … What a wonderful statement about community,” she said.

On stage for “In the Mood” are volunteer cast members from the Church of the Epiphany – ages 10-80.

The crew comprises volunteers who make the sets and do the painting as well as work on the centerpieces and decorations and others who do the sound and lighting.

“It is all a community event,” Grefsheim said.

New this year, the dinner theater performance entertains during the parish’s annual gala and live auction fund-raising event.

“This is exciting for the folks attending the fundraiser, as they also have the opportunity to hear the show as part of their evening of bidding in the silent and live auction and great food prepared by an awarding winning restaurant chef,” Grefsheim said.

“This also allows our community to work together for the good of the church, such an important part of any event held at the church community.”

Sue Austreng is at sue.austreng@ecm-inc.com

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