Celebration of diversity

Paying homage to the diverse cultures of Anoka Middle School for the Arts students and families, the school staged its third-annual multicultural celebration March 27.

The event began in the cafeteria, where folks tasted a selection of ethnic foods and perused collections of cultural artifacts.

Later the school auditorium served as center stage for a variety of performances showcasing students’ talents.

“Our theme this year is ‘Tell Me Your Story,’” said Principal Jerri McGonigal, describing her staff’s desire to listen to students’ stories, learn more about each child’s background, and hear the connections they keep with their diverse cultures.

“We just want to celebrate every one of you,” the students’ principal told them before the showcase began.

Sue Austreng is at [email protected]

AMSA life science teacher John Jacobson worked in Cameroon for many years. Here he shares tales of his time in the west African country with Atu Akaa and her son Jesse, who was born in Cameroon and is one of Jacobson’s students at the middle school. Photos by Sue Austreng Bonnie Thompson stops by a display of native American artifacts and talks with Mary Beth Elhardt (a member of the Cherokee nation) and Mindy Meyers (a member of the Algonquin nation) during the March 27 multicultural celebration at Anoka Middle School for the Arts. Members of Anoka Middle School for the Arts’ fiddle club play some tunes during the school’s multicultural celebration. Lorraine Wongbi takes the stage and sings a solo during the performance section of Anoka Middle School for the Arts’ multicultural celebration. Showcasing his musical talent and celebrating multiculturalism Ben Lockwood (in character as Jean Valjean) sings “Stars” from Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables.” Nick Waskosky and Hailey Leisenfeld dance to a lively tune during Anoka Middle School for the Arts’ March 27 multicultural celebration. Jenna Eagles performs a gymnastic routine on stage, celebrating multiculturalism and talent.
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AMSA life science teacher John Jacobson worked in Cameroon for many years. Here he shares tales of his time in the west African country with Atu Akaa and her son Jesse, who was born in Cameroon and is one of Jacobson’s students at the middle school. Photos by Sue Austreng