AMSA students show off artistry at annual festival

Anoka Middle School for the Arts hosted its annual Arts Festival May 8.

A long-standing tradition at AMSA, the Arts Festival invites families to both the Fred Moore and Washington campuses to see what students have been up to all year.

Sixth-grader Kayla Bucek shows her brother Javonni Cotto, 4, how she uses a pottery wheel at the annual Anoka Middle School for the Arts festival May 8. Photos by Olivia Koester

Sixth-grader Kayla Bucek shows her brother Javonni Cotto, 4, how she uses a pottery wheel at the annual Anoka Middle School for the Arts festival May 8. Photos by Olivia Koester

Young dancers and musicians performed throughout the evening.

Students and their families could participate in a variety of activities: practicing archery, making Chinese calligraphy art, racing through math problems and more.

Various classrooms set up demonstrations so that students could showcase what they’ve learned this year.

Ceramics students offered wheel throwing demonstrations.

From behind the pottery wheel, sixth-grader Roman Sterpu said that ceramics was difficult when he first started. But as the year comes to a close, Roman was able to churn out smooth cylinders with ease in front of his family at the festival.

Ceramics is his favorite class because “we get our hands dirty,” he said with a mischievous grin.

In the library media centers, student writers had the opportunity to recite original work, some of which appeared in “The Storm,” AMSA’s award-winning literary journal.

Last year, “The Storm” was one of 26 literary magazines across the nation to receive the Highest Award from the National Council of Teachers of English.

The new edition of “The Storm” debuts at the Arts Festival annually.

Submitted student work goes through a rigorous selection process at the school-level, according to Jolanda Dranchak, AMSA curriculum integration coordinator. Fewer than 70 pieces of literary and visual student work were included in the journal this year.

All of AMSA’s more than 1,800 students had art on display at the festival – everything from pillowcases made in fabric arts class to coordinate drawings created in math.

Olivia Koester is at olivia.koester@ecm-inc.com

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