Opinion

Imagine this: Your 15-year-old son becomes seriously ill. Is it cancer or some other life-threatening disease? You whisk him off to the emergency room. Within days, you have updates on Facebook. “Billy is doing much better.” “The medicine is working!” “He’s going to be OK.”

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Youngsters like Kerrie Maleski, Kayley Schoonmaker, Matt Rubel, and Will Tully are part of a major trend in Minnesota. They are among the growing number of students in Minnesota’s two-year community colleges. They’ve also been elected as leaders of the Minnesota State College Student Association.

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In May of 1914, a new set of advertisements appeared in the Union. Readers were advised to “begin laying plans” for a “festival of joy.” A week of “first grade educational entertainment” was on its way. These “seven glorious days of clean enjoyment” would include orchestra, opera singers, alpine yodelers, a Shakespeare play, a scientific demonstration, and daily lectures on such topic as the Panama Canal, the story of New Zealand, love and brotherhood, and the future of America.

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Well, that was fast.

This summer went by way too fast. I know we hear this all the time and for me, its a sign of quality time spent with friends and family relaxing – and of course continuing to manage a busy work schedule.

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Reputation is an important asset to corporations and those who know it do what they can to build it. To achieve prestige requires a long-term outlook toward building competitive advantage. Companies develop winning reputations by both creating and projecting a set of skills that their constituents recognize and are unique. For some companies, that means differentiating themselves through innovation—nurturing good ideas, translating them into products, and marketing them well.

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