ABC Newspapers http://abcnewspapers.com Local News from The Anoka County Union, Blaine Spring Lake Park Life and The Coon Rapids Herald Fri, 24 Apr 2015 20:00:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Ramsey Council approves $3.1 million bid for new fire station http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/ramsey-council-approves-3-1-million-bid-for-new-fire-station/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/ramsey-council-approves-3-1-million-bid-for-new-fire-station/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 20:00:48 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=157829 The Ramsey City Council April 14 approved a bid for construction of the new Fire Station 2 for the Ramsey Fire Department.

Volunteer firefighters accustomed to Fire Station 2’s current location will not have to search long and hard to find the new home because it is just north of the current site.

The Ramsey Fire Department approved a $3.14 million contract with Brennan Construction, of Mankato, to construct a 12,000-square-foot fire station on a 2.34-acre site. Courtesy of the city of Ramsey

The Ramsey Fire Department approved a $3.14 million contract with Brennan Construction, of Mankato, to construct a 12,000-square-foot fire station on a 2.34-acre site. Courtesy of the city of Ramsey

The new station will be at 5650 Alpine Drive NW. The current Fire Station 2 was constructed in 1988 on what was then the city of Ramsey’s main campus. When the new Ramsey Municipal Center was constructed in 2006, the fire station use remained but the long-term vision of the city was to abandon this site, sell the land and build a new fire station.

The lowest construction bid came from Mankato-based Brennan Construction at a price tag of $3.14 million. The second lowest bid of $3.16 million was also below the $3.39 million construction estimate from BKV Group, the city’s consultant.

A groundbreaking date has not been set, but the construction contract calls for 330 days to build the one-story, 12,000-square-foot building that will also house a Ramsey Police Department substation and a parking space for an Allina ambulance, according to Fire Chief Dean Kapler.

Council Member Mark Kuzma said having the ambulance will be “an additional safety feature.”

The station will be larger than Fire Station 1 on Armstrong Boulevard, north of Bunker Lake Boulevard, because of the police and ambulance substations, Kapler said.

However, the training room at Station 1 is more than double the size of the training center planned for Station 2 because it is the central hub of training for firefighters of all three stations. Station 3 is located in Nowthen, which reimburses Ramsey for providing fire protection services.

The kitchen, dayroom and turnout gear storage areas sizes will be fairly similar, but Fire Station 2 will have a much larger apparatus bay for storing fire trucks.

Taxpayers are still paying for Fire Station 1, which was constructed in 2001, but Finance Director Diana Lund is timing the debt repayments for both fire stations so that Ramsey residents and other property owners are not paying construction debt on two fire stations in one year.

According to Lund, the last year that the city levy will include debt repayment for Fire Station 1 is 2016. The next year, Fire Station 2 debt repayments will start.

Lund had estimated a $293,000 levy in 2017 for Fire Station 2, which would be $153,000 higher than the 2016 payment for Fire Station 1, but said that the 2017 levy will be slightly lower since this was based on old construction cost estimates.

The council will vote on a bond sale at its May 26 meeting.

BKV Group has been involved in designing this new fire station and will supervise the construction and give Kapler weekly updates. This contract will be $50,000. The city originally had been looking at a $34,000 contract that would have included updates once every two weeks.

Council Member Chris Riley asked if having BKV Group on as a construction project manager would reduce the chances of change orders coming in.

“We still might run into some issues along the way that require some change orders,” Kapler said. “I think there are very few projects that don’t have change orders along the way, but we thought the value in this is it is a substantial project. To have that second set of eyes on site … certainly was deemed valuable enough to enter into that part of the agreement.”

Mayor Sarah Strommen said having BKV Group in charge of day-to-day oversight so that Kapler is free to perform his regular duties as fire chief makes more sense.

“It’s a more efficient use of our staff time,” Strommen said. “We don’t manage these type of construction projects every day, thank goodness.”

Kapler added that BKV Group has been involved in this project since the beginning design stages so he finds value in having them see the project through to completion.

“They are intimately knowledgeable on everything from the time we picked that site all the way up to tonight,” Kapler said. “They’ve been through the design process. They know our needs and frankly I think they’ve done a fantastic job with it.”

eric.hagen@ecm-inc.com

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Biz Owners’ Cash Needs http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/biz-owners-cash-needs/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/biz-owners-cash-needs/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 20:00:03 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?guid=b97478b2e838c7f45a6bca7adca0be5d As a business owner, you’ve heard “cash is king.” And the truth is, it is. Besides the cash that keeps your business operating every day, you need to prepare for extra cash needs you and your business have.

To start, let’s clear up the confusion between profit and cash. Profit isn’t cash you can spend. Too many times when I talk with business owners, they tell me about all the money they make, and then they start telling me about some new toys they want to buy.

I bet that most of you don’t want to take your profits and blow them. Having cash isn’t just about paying your bills or buying new stuff. It’s also about living a financially protected life now and in the future. Keeping enough cash to take care of these items helps you sleep better at night.

1. Lean times. There’s always a disaster around the corner. If your business is doing well, that’s great. And if you are in business for a while, you know that good times don’t last forever.

You need a disaster fund for both your personal expenses as well as business ones. During a downturn in the economy (which is a question of when, not if), you’ll be glad you put away some cash.

2. Retirement. Every time I hear people say they’ll retire on the proceeds from the sale of their business, I want to scream: “Are you crazy?” I can tell you that very few business owners can do that. The rest of us have to make sure we save on a regular basis.

Take some of your profit and put it away so that you can afford to retire. This gives you the choice on when it’s time to leave. Isn’t that something you want?

3. Cash flow hiccups. For example, an accident or illness can keep you out of work for a long time. I know this one from firsthand experience. When I went through my cancer treatments, I was lucky I had a cash cushion. As much as I wanted to work, it took me over two years before I was even close to being able to come back.

4. Business growth. If you think you can get all the cash you need from your bank to grow your business, think again. It is going to want you to come up with a significant amount of cash from alternative sources. Your bank is probably willing to be your partner, but not the only one providing the money.

All of these extra cash needs add up. Do yourself a favor. Take a few minutes to write them down and save for them. It’s a giant step toward living a life that is financially secured.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Josh Patrick is a founding principal of Stage 2 Planning Partners in South Burlington, Vt. He contributes to The New York Times You’re the Boss blog and works with owners of privately held businesses helping them create business and personal value. You can learn more about his Objective Review process at his website.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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As a business owner, you’ve heard “cash is king.” And the truth is, it is. Besides the cash that keeps your business operating every day, you need to prepare for extra cash needs you and your business have.

To start, let’s clear up the confusion between profit and cash. Profit isn’t cash you can spend. Too many times when I talk with business owners, they tell me about all the money they make, and then they start telling me about some new toys they want to buy.

I bet that most of you don’t want to take your profits and blow them. Having cash isn’t just about paying your bills or buying new stuff. It’s also about living a financially protected life now and in the future. Keeping enough cash to take care of these items helps you sleep better at night.

1. Lean times. There’s always a disaster around the corner. If your business is doing well, that’s great. And if you are in business for a while, you know that good times don’t last forever.

You need a disaster fund for both your personal expenses as well as business ones. During a downturn in the economy (which is a question of when, not if), you’ll be glad you put away some cash.

2. Retirement. Every time I hear people say they’ll retire on the proceeds from the sale of their business, I want to scream: “Are you crazy?” I can tell you that very few business owners can do that. The rest of us have to make sure we save on a regular basis.

Take some of your profit and put it away so that you can afford to retire. This gives you the choice on when it’s time to leave. Isn’t that something you want?

3. Cash flow hiccups. For example, an accident or illness can keep you out of work for a long time. I know this one from firsthand experience. When I went through my cancer treatments, I was lucky I had a cash cushion. As much as I wanted to work, it took me over two years before I was even close to being able to come back.

4. Business growth. If you think you can get all the cash you need from your bank to grow your business, think again. It is going to want you to come up with a significant amount of cash from alternative sources. Your bank is probably willing to be your partner, but not the only one providing the money.

All of these extra cash needs add up. Do yourself a favor. Take a few minutes to write them down and save for them. It’s a giant step toward living a life that is financially secured.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Josh Patrick is a founding principal of Stage 2 Planning Partners in South Burlington, Vt. He contributes to The New York Times You’re the Boss blog and works with owners of privately held businesses helping them create business and personal value. You can learn more about his Objective Review process at his website.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Anoka man charged in fatal Chanhassen crash http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/anoka-man-charged-in-fatal-chanhassen-crash/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/anoka-man-charged-in-fatal-chanhassen-crash/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 18:00:38 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=157851 An Anoka man has been charged in a fatal crash that occurred in Chanhassen on May 1, 2014.

According to the Carver County Sheriff’s Office, a 911 call reported a personal injury vehicle accident at the intersection of County Road 61 (Flying Cloud Drive) and Stoughton Avenue in Chanhassen at 3:06 p.m. on May 1, 2014. Witnesses reported seeing a van eastbound on County Road 61 veer to the right, strike the guardrail and then go into the westbound lanes where it stuck a westbound car.

The driver of the westbound car, Eli Russel, 29, of Dassel, was killed at the scene. The driver of the eastbound van, James O’Brien, 53, of Chaska, was transported to the hospital with serious injuries.

The case remained under investigation and on Tuesday, April 7, O’Brien, now an Anoka resident, was charged with two counts of Criminal Vehicular Homicide or Operation in connection with the crash.

The Minnesota State Patrol reconstructed the crash and determined O’Brien’s vehicle was traveling east on Flying Cloud Drive and failed to follow the curve in the roadway. O’Brien’s vehicle struck the guardrail and deflected to the left, into the westbound lane of the road, striking the victim’s westbound vehicle. O’Brien was travelling 45-50 miles per hour. Russel, who was traveling westbound, was unable to avoid the collision with O’Brien’s vehicle. Russel was killed as a result of the impact with O’Brien’s vehicle.

The crash reconstruction report concludes that the crash cannot be attributed to man-made or natural road defects, road conditions due to weather or mechanical defects of the vehicles. The crash can, however, be attributed to O’Brien’s failure to maintain control of his vehicle. Further, the report concludes O’Brien’s failure to control his vehicle is attributed to impairment from pharmaceutical drug use.

Testing of O’Brien’s blood revealed the presence of Lorazepam, a schedule IV controlled substance. O’Brien is scheduled for his next court appearance at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, April 24.13

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Attacking That Card Debt http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/attacking-that-card-debt/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/attacking-that-card-debt/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 17:00:03 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?guid=5831d8e353b2c5990306fff7688a8a06 The price to sleep better at night for Lisa was $40,000. That was how much she owed in credit card debt. But getting her to take the painful steps to reduce that debt was tough. For instance, there were the gifts she loved to give to her beloved niece.

Years of good-hearted or fun purchases added up to an intimidating amount. Lisa made the minimum payment each month, but the balance just didn’t seem to be going anywhere. Lisa, in her 50s, felt that she had to do something, but didn’t know what that was.

She tried asking for help. The first few phone calls she made didn’t end up so well. A couple of financial representatives tried to sell her products and never returned her calls after she asked them about her debt problem.

Exhausted by this emotional burden, month in and month out, Lisa reached out to Andrew Feldman, a financial planner in Chicago.

Feldman sat down with Lisa. They sized up her situation. Adding up the balances, they discovered that she owed $40,000 in credit card debt at annual interest rates around 15%.

She and her advisor created a plan to keep her from accumulating more debt and to start reducing it. The first thing was calling her credit card issuers to ask them to lower her interest rates. They refused, but it was worth trying anyway.

Feldman asked her to make more than the minimum payments every month, starting from an additional $50 and increasing from there. Making a payment that was not much higher than the interest meant it would take her forever to get out of debt. The $50 initial payment got her used to tackling her debt; the escalating amounts from there were designed to actually whittle it down.

He suggested ways to downsize her lifestyle: no more fancy presents for her niece, cut back on dining out and stop writing checks to charities. Having a well-paying job, a comfortable lifestyle and a generous nature, Lisa didn’t love that. She resisted some of his ideas, particularly when it came to her niece.

The advisor changed her mind by pointing out that her situation could get a lot worse than it was. “You have to plan for you losing your job tomorrow,” Feldman told her. He showed her the math of adding extra payments to motivate her.

So, instead of buying gifts, Lisa took her niece out to the zoo. She donated her time, rather than money, to the charity she supported, volunteering to work at an animal shelter.

Taking these steps and seeing results were a great encouragement for her. The more she saw her balance dropped, the more confident she felt.

Staying committed was difficult, but she was not alone. Her advisor kept reminding her that there’s light at the end of the tunnel, especially when financial hiccups happened. Lisa had an accident with her car that cost her thousands. It was a frustrating setback, but she started repaying her debt as soon as she could.

Sometimes, people just need their hands held, Feldman said.

That was almost three years ago. Lisa made her last payment this year. Feldman called her, congratulated on her achievement and said half-jokingly, “Let’s not do this again.” She readily agreed.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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The price to sleep better at night for Lisa was $40,000. That was how much she owed in credit card debt. But getting her to take the painful steps to reduce that debt was tough. For instance, there were the gifts she loved to give to her beloved niece.

Years of good-hearted or fun purchases added up to an intimidating amount. Lisa made the minimum payment each month, but the balance just didn’t seem to be going anywhere. Lisa, in her 50s, felt that she had to do something, but didn’t know what that was.

She tried asking for help. The first few phone calls she made didn’t end up so well. A couple of financial representatives tried to sell her products and never returned her calls after she asked them about her debt problem.

Exhausted by this emotional burden, month in and month out, Lisa reached out to Andrew Feldman, a financial planner in Chicago.

Feldman sat down with Lisa. They sized up her situation. Adding up the balances, they discovered that she owed $40,000 in credit card debt at annual interest rates around 15%.

She and her advisor created a plan to keep her from accumulating more debt and to start reducing it. The first thing was calling her credit card issuers to ask them to lower her interest rates. They refused, but it was worth trying anyway.

Feldman asked her to make more than the minimum payments every month, starting from an additional $50 and increasing from there. Making a payment that was not much higher than the interest meant it would take her forever to get out of debt. The $50 initial payment got her used to tackling her debt; the escalating amounts from there were designed to actually whittle it down.

He suggested ways to downsize her lifestyle: no more fancy presents for her niece, cut back on dining out and stop writing checks to charities. Having a well-paying job, a comfortable lifestyle and a generous nature, Lisa didn’t love that. She resisted some of his ideas, particularly when it came to her niece.

The advisor changed her mind by pointing out that her situation could get a lot worse than it was. “You have to plan for you losing your job tomorrow,” Feldman told her. He showed her the math of adding extra payments to motivate her.

So, instead of buying gifts, Lisa took her niece out to the zoo. She donated her time, rather than money, to the charity she supported, volunteering to work at an animal shelter.

Taking these steps and seeing results were a great encouragement for her. The more she saw her balance dropped, the more confident she felt.

Staying committed was difficult, but she was not alone. Her advisor kept reminding her that there’s light at the end of the tunnel, especially when financial hiccups happened. Lisa had an accident with her car that cost her thousands. It was a frustrating setback, but she started repaying her debt as soon as she could.

Sometimes, people just need their hands held, Feldman said.

That was almost three years ago. Lisa made her last payment this year. Feldman called her, congratulated on her achievement and said half-jokingly, “Let’s not do this again.” She readily agreed.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Island tale dances into Blaine http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/island-tale-dances-into-blaine/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/island-tale-dances-into-blaine/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 16:47:20 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=157892 Blaine High School presents the musical, “Once on this Island,” opening May 1.

Dancers Ellen Anderson, Emma Wilson, Shelby Lewis, Dot Clark and Erebi Ngenkan and Maya Richardson as Ti Moune perform as Blaine High School presents “Once on this Island.”

Dancers Ellen Anderson, Emma Wilson, Shelby Lewis, Dot Clark and Erebi Ngenkan and Maya Richardson as Ti Moune perform as Blaine High School presents “Once on this Island.” Photo submitted

Clad in colorful costumes and moving in tropical dance, the cast tells the story of love and loss, fear and frolic.

Once upon a time on an island far, far away, a peasant girl rescued a wealthy boy. Soon she falls in love with him.

Little did she know, the gods presiding over the island made a bet over which is stronger: love or death. The stakes? The life of the peasant girl.

The island comes to the stage at Blaine High School 7 p.m. May 1, 2, 8 and 9 and 2 p.m. May 9. May 2 is an American Sign Language performance.

Tickets for all performances ($10, adults; $5, students and seniors) are available at SeatYourself.biz.blainehs or by calling 763-506-6666.

Blaine High School is located at 12555 University Ave NE, Blaine.

Sue.Austreng@ecm-inc.com

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Doors could close on ACBC delivery service for seniors http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/doors-could-close-on-acbc-delivery-service-for-seniors/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/doors-could-close-on-acbc-delivery-service-for-seniors/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 16:00:40 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=157847 Every month for more than one year a van packed with boxes of fresh, nutritious food has made its way from the ACBC Food Shelf to the homes of 56 hungry, homebound seniors in the Anoka area.

Thanks to a Minnesota Department of Health grant and a partnership between the food shelf and Store to Door, the delivery service allows qualifying seniors to receive boxes of pre-selected items at their home free of charge.

Jerri Loughry, executive director of ACBC Food Shelf, sorts some canned goods for seniors registered for Store to Door service. Photo by Sue Austreng

Jerri Loughry, executive director of ACBC Food Shelf, sorts some canned goods for seniors registered for Store to Door service. Photo by Sue Austreng

However, Jerri Loughry, executive director of the food shelf, cries an urgent plea today because she just got word that the grant that funds the program ends June 30.

“This has been such a valuable way we have been able to serve this vulnerable population, Loughry said.

“The seniors population is the least served. They don’t want to ask for help because they don’t want to take anything away from families in need. They were raised to be self-sufficient, not depend on others. And there’s pride, too. So many times we are not aware of seniors in need because they don’t ask for help.”

Store to Door is a non-profit organization helping to provide the delivery service for homebound seniors over the age of 65 who meet the income qualifications for assistance from the food shelf.

Since partnering with Store to Door in January 2014, Loughry reports that 56 ACBC clients have been using the service each month and 11 seniors are on a waiting list.

Loughry said that the food shelf’s clients could continue to receive the service, but at a cost of $12 per delivery.

“We’d like to continue this service – there is definitely a need – but our clients can’t afford to make the $12 payments for the service,” she said.

And so Loughry seeks donors who will give money specifically for the Store to Door service.

“These are extras we do and we would like to continue to do if we can. But to do that we need the money to do that,” she said.

Summer needs

As the school year ends and summer vacation approaches, Loughry has identified a need for help serving local students in need, as well.

“We always do summer food bags for the kids – it’s a $5,000 project and we need donors for that, too,” Loughry said.

Other needs Loughry has seen recently are donations of larger diapers (sizes 3, 4, 5 and 6) and feminine hygiene products.

“We get lots of donations of food and we seem to have plenty of smaller diapers and soaps and shampoos and things, but the larger diapers and the feminine hygiene items, we are in need of those right now,” she said.

To make donations of any kind, to learn more about Store to Door or to keep up to date with services provided at ACBC Food Shelf, call 763-422-0046 or visit acbcfoodshelf.org.

Sue.Austreng@ecm-inc.com

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Local law enforcement agencies adapt prevention programs in changing times http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/local-law-enforcement-agencies-adapt-prevention-programs-in-changing-times/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/local-law-enforcement-agencies-adapt-prevention-programs-in-changing-times/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 14:00:46 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=157831 Though it is illegal, youth between the ages of 12 and 20 drink 11 percent of all alcohol consumed in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When children start drinking before age 15, they are five times more likely to abuse alcohol as adults.

Eighty percent of adults who smoke tried their first cigarette before age 18, so preventing young people from becoming addicted is a key strategy for reducing tobacco use in general, according to the Teens and Tobacco in Minnesota report, released in November by the Minnesota Department of Health, Center for Health Equity and Center for Health Statistics.

Coon Rapids Police officer Ken Young addresses Eisenhower Elementary School fifth-graders as they prepare to graduate from the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program March 27. Photo by Olivia Alveshere

Coon Rapids Police officer Ken Young addresses Eisenhower Elementary School fifth-graders as they prepare to graduate from the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program March 27. Photo by Olivia Alveshere

In tandem, educators and law enforcement officers look to bring prevention education to students so they know how to react in many situations, such as when someone offers them a cigarette, when their boyfriend or girlfriend hands them a drink, when a fight breaks out between friends or when someone unfamiliar reaches out to them online.

Prevention education comes in many forms, and schools try to stay ahead of the curve as technology changes the way students communicate.

Barry Scanlan, prevention coordinator in the Anoka-Hennepin School District, was made aware of new apps that allow smartphone users to virtually smoke cigarettes and marijuana and snort cocaine.

“For the first time, you can ride the rails of cocaine everywhere!” a description of an app called Snort Cocaine reads. “No more problem with the cops!”

The app rewards users for snorting the most cocaine in the shortest amount of time.

“It’s just weird stuff like that,” Scanlan said. “You name the drug, and we’re trying to keep up on it.”

Anoka-Hennepin has drug prevention staff development planned for early September.

Law enforcement is available to back up teachers during the school year.

Drug Abuse Resistance Education

Several police departments in the district offer Drug Abuse Resistance Education programming, or DARE, in the schools. Others have opted for a different curriculum.

DARE began as a partnership between the Los Angeles Police Department and Los Angeles Unified School District in 1983 as drug prevention education specifically.

It spread across the nation, into approximately 75 percent of school districts and into 58 foreign countries, according to Michael Lien, DARE America director of regional operations.

“Our foreign market continues to expand at a fair to moderate pace,” he said. In the United States, a 10 percent decline started in 2000, and DARE is in an estimated 65 percent of United States school districts today, Lien said.

DARE has expanded its curriculum from drug prevention to include violence prevention, Internet safety and more.

Curriculum is available for youth from birth to high school graduation, though the fifth-grade curriculum is most popular, Lien said.

About half of Anoka-Hennepin fifth-graders go through the DARE program.

Anoka, Brooklyn Park, Champlin and Coon Rapids police departments provide DARE education, as does the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office.

Anoka Police officer Zach Robertson is in his second year teaching DARE. He is currently nearing the end of a 10-week course with Franklin Elementary School students.

He appreciates DARE’s emphasis on responsible decision-making in general, rather than focusing solely on alcohol and drugs.

“It’s going to make a difference in some student’s life,” Robertson said.

In addition to equipping students with the confidence and the vocabulary to withstand peer pressure, “it’s a great community policing tool,” he said. “We’re not scary monsters. … We don’t want to get a bad rap in our community.”

Eisenhower Elementary School fifth-graders graduated from the DARE program March 27.

“As you go to middle school next year, you might be faced with some new situations, new challenges,” Principal Kari Rock said to students before Coon Rapids Police officer Ken Young addressed them at the graduation ceremony.

Throughout the 10-week course, Young, who has taught DARE in Coon Rapids for 15 years, encouraged students to ask him questions openly.

Students threw silly questions his way: Do you eat doughnuts? But they also had serious questions arise: How do I get Mom and Dad to quit smoking?

At graduation, four students read essays they wrote at the end of their DARE experience.

Kaci Schmoll dissected the DARE decision-making model: define, assess, respond and evaluate. She applied the model to determine whether she should go to a friend’s birthday party or soccer practice one evening.

Viktoria Erickson recollected resistance strategies discussed in DARE.

“When I’m in bad situations, I will walk away or change the subject,” she said. “Because of DARE, I pledge to stay drug and violence free.”

But the Anoka County Sheriff’s Office and Blaine, Spring Lake Park and St. Francis police departments have seen too many kids break that promise. All once offered DARE and did away with the program years ago.

“There was a lot of criticism of the program’s cost, and school districts and law enforcement agencies lost interest in participating and funding the program,” said Cmdr. Paul Sommer of the Anoka County Sheriff’s Office. Additionally, research pointed to DARE’s ineffectiveness in the early 2000s, he said.

Some schools have also pushed to eliminate DARE.

Deputy Todd Lundgren, of the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office, teaches DARE at a number of schools, which used to include Dayton Elementary, Evergreen Park World Cultures Community School and Monroe Elementary. All have done away with DARE.

Monroe Elementary School backed out of the program this year, emailing Lundgren to say the school did not have time for DARE with increased pressure to improve test scores, he said.

It’s something Lien hears frequently nationwide.

“They are having to teach more to the test,” he said.

DARE alternatives

The Blaine Police Department used to run DARE programs in Anoka-Hennepin, Centennial and Spring Lake Park school districts, but budgetary constraints and DARE’s structured nature prompted the department to jump ship, opting instead to use CounterAct curriculum, developed by the Golden Valley Police Department and Hazelden Foundation.

Training sets DARE apart from other crime prevention programs. Only uniformed law enforcement officers with a minimum of two years experience are eligible to teach DARE and must go through an intensive two-week training before stepping in front of kids.

“That seasoning and seniority brings good things to the table,” Lien said.

But it comes with a cost that some departments are unable to shoulder.

With CounterAct, the Blaine Police Department could send crime prevention staff in to run classes, rather than uniformed officers who could be better utilized elsewhere in the city, Chief Chris Olson said.

Two years ago, Blaine dropped the CounterAct curriculum and started its own prevention education program: Choices Today, Choices for Life.

Crime prevention staff run an eight-week course for fifth-graders in Anoka-Hennepin schools, but not in Centennial or Spring Lake Park schools at this time.

“We’ve had internal discussions” about expanding the program, Olson said. With still relatively new curriculum, “we have not reached out to those schools.”

The Choices curriculum allows Blaine staff to localize lessons, according to Wende Ferguson, support services manager.

For example, affected by the death of a 19-year-old who overdosed on bath salts in Blaine several years ago, students have many questions about synthetic drugs, Ferguson said.

Spring Lake Park landed on National Child Safety Council curriculum when it saw contacts with students who were graduates of the DARE program starting to rise, Chief Doug Ebeltoft said.

“We were not seeing a whole lot positive coming from (DARE),” he said. “We keep looking for ways to reach out to the community – some things work, some things don’t.”

Spring Lake Park does not send an officer into the schools for eight or 10 weeks at a time.

“It’s a continuous, ongoing education,” Ebeltoft said.

St. Francis is trying something new this year.

The Police Department hired an educational liaison in mid-2014.

“This officer’s primary role is to provide the education piece” that police and educators agreed was missing after DARE programming was shut down about eight years ago, according to Chief Jeff Harapat.

“One of the big reasons that DARE went away, and I was the ogre that made it go away, is … because of the split in our community with schools,” Harapat said.

Because of city boundaries in the St. Francis School District, students that lived west of Highway 47 had DARE in elementary school, but students living east of Highway 47 did not, and that did not sit well with Harapat, he said.

Officer Jody Cole, a former DARE officer, joined the St. Francis Police Department in May and has been getting into the schools ever since.

“What I’ve done so far is just trying to establish relationships with the kids so they see a positive view of police versus just always thinking police just arrest people and go and give people tickets,” she said.

She has been to almost every classroom in the elementary schools and has spent a large amount of time going over the consequences of drinking alcohol and using drugs with middle school students in health class, she said.

Ultimately, prevention programming is not one-size-fits-all. Effective programming takes into account a local community’s needs and resources and goes from there, law enforcement officials agreed.

olivia.alveshere@ecm-inc.com

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Writer’s Block: Slow down, save family dinners http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/writers-block-slow-down-save-family-dinners/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/writers-block-slow-down-save-family-dinners/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:33:08 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=157731 I’m not a bad cook, but I’m no Julia Child either.

Olivia Alveshere

Olivia Alveshere

I pretended I was once in junior high. Absent for a home economics class, I set up my video camera on a tripod and recorded myself making breadsticks at home to earn back the participation points I had lost.

“Knead the dough,” I commanded my audience. I explained what a pastry brush was as I applied an egg wash to the breadsticks before popping them in the oven.

I paused the camera while they baked and turned it on again to record myself taking a big bite of my creation. What a weirdo.

My husband, Matt, and I recently enrolled in a bread class at Cooks of Crocus Hill.

We drove over to Stillwater and joined some other couples, mother-daughter duos and a gaggle of girlfriends in the kitchen to learn the art of bread-making from Chef Ryan.

It truly is an art form, but sadly, a dying one.

In some ways, I see why. It takes hours to create the perfect loaf, and millennials are short on time.

If grocery store shelves are any indication, our culture is one of “instant” this, “instant” that.

Pizza is a prime example of our patience in the kitchen:

We pay for food to come to us, ordering pizza for delivery online.

When we want to get out of the house, there are plenty of pizzerias serving up pies; some have buffets for instant gratification.

Papa Murphy’s popularity has grown tremendously in my lifetime as people opt to take-and-bake.

At home, most freezers are stocked with pizza – my local Cub Foods devotes almost an entire aisle to the various brands.

If someone suggests making homemade pizza for dinner, in my experience, the crust is usually an exception. Trader Joe’s sells excellent pizza dough, and I am partial to the Betty Crocker “instant” pizza crust mix.

I rarely mix up truly homemade pizza dough at home. Two hours to let yeast work its magic are hard to come by.

Matt and I are hungry after a long commute home.

Today, most households have both heads working full time, which was not the case in bread-making’s heyday.

Logically, the decline of bread-making accompanies the breakdown of breaking bread.

As newlyweds with no children of our own yet, it’s relatively easy for us to work together to get dinner on the table after a long day in the office.

Mealtime would be that much more stressful if we had a baby to care for, a toddler to chase or an older child to cart off to piano or soccer.

Many days, I don’t make it home for dinner, opting to pack a frozen meal to microwave before a city council or school board meeting.

When Matt and I are able to dine together, we usually wolf down our supper in order to make a commitment at church or meet up with friends.

I want to change that.

In pre-marital counseling, we had to draw a picture of our family dinner table growing up.

My mom always sat closest to the kitchen, and I sat at the head of the table. (Maybe the rumors about only children are true! Did I rule the roost?) My dad’s back was to our sliding glass door that led to the backyard.

We always discussed what our days looked like and what we had on tap for the rest of the week.

I want that for my family. I want to talk instead of text. Crowding around the dinner table will be more filling and fulfilling than a meal on the run.

A full, busy life comes with rewards, but those should not come at the expense of family dinner.


olivia.alveshere@ecm-inc.com

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60/40 Mix: Not So Great http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/6040-mix-not-so-great/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/6040-mix-not-so-great/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:30:03 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?guid=dc68f612da9c6b7e2be5b44ba9d05211 The magic asset allocation number so often touted is a 60/40 split between stocks and bonds. This is supposed to give you the growth potential of equities and the stability of fixed-income. Trouble is, that mix didn’t do so well over the past 10 years.

Most likely the reason is that almost all asset classes suffered during the financial crisis, which the past 10 years captures. So the supposedly safer types of securities didn’t do such a terrific job offsetting the massacre in stocks.

None of this is to say that a stock-bond mix is a bad idea. It’s simply not a panacea.

Today, it is easier than ever to own a broadly diversified stock/bond portfolio, often represented as a pie. You can buy blended 60/40 “pie” portfolios in the form of a mutual fund. A good example is the DFA Global Allocation 60/40 (DGSIX) fund, which has a broad range of both domestic and international stocks and bonds, for a rough breakdown of 60% equities and 40% bonds. 

Over the past 10 years, target-date pie funds became popular in 401(k) plans, where the stock/bond blend shifts toward bonds progressively as you age, until you reach a retirement target date.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:unnamed.jpg

The latest portfolio pie offerings are from robo-advisors who place a slick Internet user interface between the investor and the fund. The replacement of a human contact with a website is what warrants the word “robo.” For some investors, this gimmick creates a sensation of customized, technologically advanced wealth management.
 
The number of investment pie offerings today nearly equals the number of pizza pie offerings in Manhattan – sometimes referred to as “grease wheels.” Using the Dimension fund as a proxy, let’s look at how the pie approach worked during the last major downturn.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:DGSIX.jpg

Back in those harrowing days, the investment pie approach was not particularly effective in avoiding major downside volatility, to say the least. It also placed a major drag on long-term investment performance.

Over the past 10 years, the 60/40 Dimension fund appreciated at an average annual rate of 6.4%. That 6.4% was about 1.5 percentage points below the performance of the main U.S. equity-only benchmark, the Standard & Poor’s 500 index, as embodied by the Vanguard 500 (VFINX) fund.

At one prominent robo-advisor, Wealthfront, with websites that offer forward-looking performance, expectations show about a 5% expected yearly return. While that’s not bad, it’s not exactly sizzling.

What about asset allocations other than 60/40? Well, there’s no elixir here, either. Three exchange-traded funds let you try different levels of risk: AOK, AOM and AOA iShares stock/bond blended portfolios for conservative (30% stock), moderate (40%) and aggressive (70%) strategies, respectively. These three ETFs haven’t been around for 10 years, but their five-year record still lags behind the S&P 500’s. The aggressive ETF has a 10.9% annual return as of the end of March – the other two had about half that – versus the S&P’s 14.4%.

One likely reason for the ETF’s lagging returns is the stock rally after March 2009. The relatively small slug of bonds in the aggressive ETF slowed it down, compared with the all-stock S&P. The other two didn’t have enough stocks to power a better showing.

While pie investing may not have delivered great returns, it does have the benefits of being simple, disciplined and non-emotion-based. JP Morgan Asset Management estimates that the average investor earned about a 2.5% average annual return over the past 20 years, substantially less than the disciplined pie investor.

Why? Too many of these investors made emotion-driven decisions at bad times. They bailed out when the stock market tanked, and got in after it had rebounded, and re-entry was expensive. Fear and greed often appear to dominate the investment allocation process, alas.

And no asset allocation, regardless of its breakdown, can cure the ill effects of unwise stampeding in and out of markets.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Nicholas Atkeson and Andrew Houghton are the founding partners of Delta Investment Management, a registered investment advisory firm in San Francisco, and authors of the new book, Win by Not Losing: A Disciplined Approach To Building And Protecting Your Wealth In The Stock Market By Managing Your RiskAdditional market commentary and investment advice is available via their websites awww.deltaim.com and www.deltawealthaccelerator.com

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
The magic asset allocation number so often touted is a 60/40 split between stocks and bonds. This is supposed to give you the growth potential of equities and the stability of fixed-income. Trouble is, that mix didn’t do so well over the past 10 years.

Most likely the reason is that almost all asset classes suffered during the financial crisis, which the past 10 years captures. So the supposedly safer types of securities didn’t do such a terrific job offsetting the massacre in stocks.

None of this is to say that a stock-bond mix is a bad idea. It’s simply not a panacea.

Today, it is easier than ever to own a broadly diversified stock/bond portfolio, often represented as a pie. You can buy blended 60/40 “pie” portfolios in the form of a mutual fund. A good example is the DFA Global Allocation 60/40 (DGSIX) fund, which has a broad range of both domestic and international stocks and bonds, for a rough breakdown of 60% equities and 40% bonds. 

Over the past 10 years, target-date pie funds became popular in 401(k) plans, where the stock/bond blend shifts toward bonds progressively as you age, until you reach a retirement target date.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:unnamed.jpg

The latest portfolio pie offerings are from robo-advisors who place a slick Internet user interface between the investor and the fund. The replacement of a human contact with a website is what warrants the word “robo.” For some investors, this gimmick creates a sensation of customized, technologically advanced wealth management.
 
The number of investment pie offerings today nearly equals the number of pizza pie offerings in Manhattan – sometimes referred to as “grease wheels.” Using the Dimension fund as a proxy, let’s look at how the pie approach worked during the last major downturn.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:DGSIX.jpg

Back in those harrowing days, the investment pie approach was not particularly effective in avoiding major downside volatility, to say the least. It also placed a major drag on long-term investment performance.

Over the past 10 years, the 60/40 Dimension fund appreciated at an average annual rate of 6.4%. That 6.4% was about 1.5 percentage points below the performance of the main U.S. equity-only benchmark, the Standard & Poor’s 500 index, as embodied by the Vanguard 500 (VFINX) fund.

At one prominent robo-advisor, Wealthfront, with websites that offer forward-looking performance, expectations show about a 5% expected yearly return. While that’s not bad, it’s not exactly sizzling.

What about asset allocations other than 60/40? Well, there’s no elixir here, either. Three exchange-traded funds let you try different levels of risk: AOK, AOM and AOA iShares stock/bond blended portfolios for conservative (30% stock), moderate (40%) and aggressive (70%) strategies, respectively. These three ETFs haven’t been around for 10 years, but their five-year record still lags behind the S&P 500’s. The aggressive ETF has a 10.9% annual return as of the end of March – the other two had about half that – versus the S&P’s 14.4%.

One likely reason for the ETF’s lagging returns is the stock rally after March 2009. The relatively small slug of bonds in the aggressive ETF slowed it down, compared with the all-stock S&P. The other two didn’t have enough stocks to power a better showing.

While pie investing may not have delivered great returns, it does have the benefits of being simple, disciplined and non-emotion-based. JP Morgan Asset Management estimates that the average investor earned about a 2.5% average annual return over the past 20 years, substantially less than the disciplined pie investor.

Why? Too many of these investors made emotion-driven decisions at bad times. They bailed out when the stock market tanked, and got in after it had rebounded, and re-entry was expensive. Fear and greed often appear to dominate the investment allocation process, alas.

And no asset allocation, regardless of its breakdown, can cure the ill effects of unwise stampeding in and out of markets.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Nicholas Atkeson and Andrew Houghton are the founding partners of Delta Investment Management, a registered investment advisory firm in San Francisco, and authors of the new book, Win by Not Losing: A Disciplined Approach To Building And Protecting Your Wealth In The Stock Market By Managing Your RiskAdditional market commentary and investment advice is available via their websites awww.deltaim.com and www.deltawealthaccelerator.com

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
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East Bethel OKs purchase of ice arena boards, glass http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/east-bethel-oks-purchase-of-ice-arena-boards-glass/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/east-bethel-oks-purchase-of-ice-arena-boards-glass/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 12:00:08 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=157827 The East Bethel City Council agreed at its April 15 meeting to pay half of the $54,000 for used glass and boards for the East Bethel Ice Arena, with the St. Francis Youth Hockey Association and St. Francis High School Hockey Booster Club paying the other half.

Brad Kaehler, a member of the booster club, spoke on the association’s behalf at the meeting, saying he’d located the hard-to-find size of boards and glass. He said the arena has a 20-foot corner radius instead of the more standard 28 feet, and he’d had a well-known broker look for them before beginning an independent search.

“These are hard to come by,” Kaehler said about the odd size.

East Bethel acquired the existing boards and glass used in 1997, and everyone agreed they’d need to be replaced at some point. City Administrator Jack Davis said there is no quantifiable way to know exactly how much longer they’ll last. Davis and Kaehler agreed that brand-new boards and glass would cost in excess of $100,000.

Kaehler said the used equipment was being used at a rink in Canada, and the quoted price would include shipping. The seller would supervise while the local hockey teams provided volunteer labor to install the boards and glass. He said the seller wanted an answer by the end of April or would let the equipment go to another buyer.

Kaehler estimated that a broker could help sell the old equipment for potentially around $8,000 to offset the purchase price of the used boards and glass.

Asked what prompted him to do the research, he said his son was struck as a bystander at a game where a body check pushed one of the boards out of its brace.

The council members expressed apprehension about the quick purchase and pressured the organizations to name an amount they’d contribute. They wanted numbers before making a decision. Kaehler said the groups have enough in reserves to commit $22,000 then would hold a fundraiser to replenish the reserves.

The City Council talked about the ultra-lean ice-arena budget. It broke even last year and has some reserves but will no longer benefit from cell-tower lease revenues as of this year. Davis said the reserve money is meant to pay for depreciation and future big-ticket purchases such as a Zamboni machine and chiller equipment.

The mayor and council members said they appreciated the groups’ willingness to contribute substantial funds toward the boards and glass and ultimately approved the purchase unanimously.

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Swanson Sharon http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/swanson-sharon/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/swanson-sharon/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:26:05 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158049 NOTICE AND ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
DISTRICT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
Court File No.: 02-PR-15-201
In Re: Estate of
SHARON D. SWANSON, a/k/a
SHARON DOROTHY SWANSON
Decedent
It is Ordered and Notice is given that on May 26, 2015, at 9:00 a.m.,a hearing will be held in this Court at 325 East Main Street, Anoka, Minnesota, for the appointment of Scott R. Swanson, whose address is 5019 Birch Road, Minnetonka, MN 55345 as personal representative of the Estate of the Decedent in an unsupervised administration.
Any objections to the petition must be filed with the Court prior to or raised at the hearing. If proper and if no objections are filed or raised, the personal representative will be appointed with full power to administer the Estate including the power to collect all assets, to pay all legal debts, claims, taxes and expenses, to sell real and personal property, and to do all necessary acts for the Estate.
Notice is also given that (subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801) all creditors having claims against the Estate are required to present the claims to the personal representative or to the Court Administrator within four months after the date of this Notice or the claims will be barred.
No formal hearing will be held unless written objections have been filed with the Court Administrator. If no objections have been filed, the requests made in the Petition will be granted by default.
Dated: April 13, 2015
BY THE COURT
/s/ Alan F. Pendleton
Judge of District Court
Lori Meyer
Court Administrator
ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER
ERIC R. ROUSAR (#0231101)
SJOSTROM, LOFTHUS & ROUSAR, PLLP
801 Twelve Oaks Center Drive
Suite 818
Wayzata, MN 55391
Tel: 952-475-1001
Fax: 952-475-3686
e-mail: erousar@visi.com
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
382317

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Roskowinski http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/roskowinski/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/roskowinski/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:25:54 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158047 NOTICE OF AND ORDER FOR HEARING ON PETITION FOR FORMAL PROBATE OF WILL AND APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
DISTRICT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
Court File No.: 02-PR-15-194
In Re: Estate of
Mary T. Roskowinski,
also known as Mary Roskowinski,
and Mary Meyer Roskowinski,
Decedent.
It is Ordered and Notice is given that on June 9, 2015 at 9:00 a.m., a hearing will be held in this Court at the Anoka County Courthouse, 325 East Main Street, Anoka, Minnesota 55303-2489, for the formal probate of an instrument purporting to be the decedents Will dated June 29, 2013, and for the appointment of Christopher Charles Roskowinski, whose address is 5206 Norwich Ave., #202, Sherman Oaks, California 91411, as personal representative of the estate of the decedent in an unsupervised administration.
Any objections to the petition must be raised at the hearing or filed with the Court prior to the hearing. If the petition is proper and no objections are filed or raised, the personal representative will be appointed with the full power to administer the estate, including the power to collect all assets; pay all legal debts, claims, taxes, and expenses; sell real and personal property; and do all necessary acts for the estate.
Notice is also given that, subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801, all creditors having claims against the decedents estate are required to present the claims to the personal representative or to the Court within four (4) months after the date of this notice or the claims will be barred.
Dated: April 15, 2015
BY THE COURT
/s/ Alan F. Pendleton
Judge of District Court
Lori Meyer
Court Administrator
David J. Raymond
(MN# 0221818)
Raymond Law Offices, PA
5838 Blackshire Path
Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota 55076
Telephone: (651) 455-3100
Facsimile: (651 455-4811
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
381453

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Ingvall http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/ingvall/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/ingvall/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:25:49 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158045 NOTICE OF AND ORDER FOR HEARING ON PETITION FOR FORMAL ADJUDICATION OF INTESTACY, DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, FORMAL APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
DISTRICT COURT
10TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
Court File No.: 02-PR-15-205
In Re: Estate of
Jayson A. Ingvall,
Decedent.
It is Ordered and Notice is given that on May 26, 2015 at 9:00 a.m., a hearing will be held in this Court at 325 East Main Street, Anoka, Minnesota, on a petition for the adjudication of intestacy and determination of decedents heirs, and for the appointment of Christopher S. Gallagher, whose address is 11131 Xerxes Avenue South, Bloomington, Minnesota, 55431, as personal representative of the decedents estate In an unsupervised administration.
Any objections to the petition must be raised at the hearing or filed with the Court prior to the hearing. If the petition is proper and no objections are filed or raised, the personal representative will be appointed with the full power to administer the decedents estate, including the power to collect all assets; to pay all legal debts, claims, taxes, and expenses; to sell real and personal property; and to do all necessary acts for the decedents estate.
Notice is further given that, subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801, all creditors having claims against the decedents estate are required to present the claims to the personal representative or to the Court within four (4) months after the date of this notice or the claims will be barred.
Dated: April 13, 2015
BY THE COURT
/s/ Alan Pendleton,
Judge of District Court
/s/ Lori Meyer,
Court Administrator
Butts, Schneider and Butts
Spencer C. Butts
MN# 392116
155 South Lake Street
Forest Lake, MN 55025
Telephone: 651-464-6162 x7
Facsimile: 651-464-8180
spencerbutts@lakesidelawyers.com
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
381363

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Stinksi http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/stinksi/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/stinksi/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:25:44 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158043 NOTICE OF INFORMAL PROBATE OF WILL AND INFORMAL APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
DISTRICT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
Court File No.: 02-PR-15-199
In Re: Estate of
Roland A. Stinski,
Decedent.
Notice is given that an Application for Informal Probate of Will and Informal Appointment of Personal Representative was filed with the Registrar, along with a Will dated November 29, 2011, and a Codicil dated February 11, 2013. The Registrar accepted the application and appointed Cheryl L Stinski, whose address is 1612 Berne Circle NE, Fridley, Minnesota 55421, to serve as the personal representative of the decedents estate.
Any heir, devisee or other interested person may be entitled to appointment as personal representative or may object to the appointment of the personal representative. Any objection to the appointment of the personal representative must be filed with the Court, and any properly filed objection will be heard by the Court after notice is provided to interested persons of the date of hearing on the objection.
Unless objections are filed, and unless the Court orders otherwise, the personal representative has the full power to administer the estate, including, after thirty (30) days from the issuance of letters testamentary, the power to sell, encumber, lease, or distribute any interest in real estate owned by the decedent.
Notice is further given that, subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801, all creditors having claims against the decedents estate are required to present the claims to the personal representative or to the Court within four (4) months after the date of this notice or the claims will be barred.
Dated: April 8, 2015
/s/ Peggy Zdon,
Registrar
/s/ Lori Meyer,
Court Administrator
Neil Polstein (MN# 135446)
Polstein Law Office, P.C.
527 Marquette Avenue, Ste. 1660
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402
Telephone: (612) 332.8063
Facsimile: (612) 332.2089
npolstein@gmail.com
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
380812

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Latham http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/latham/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/latham/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:25:39 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158041 NOTICE OF INFORMAL APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS (INTESTATE)
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
DISTRICT COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Court File No. 02-PR-15-202
Estate of
Jimmy Earl Latham,
a/k/a Jimmy E. Latham,
Decedent.
Notice is given that an application for informal appointment of personal representative has been filed with the Registrar. No will has been presented for probate. The application has been granted.
Notice is also given that the Registrar has informally appointed Johney M. Estes, whose address is 2350 Erin Court, New Brighton, MN, 55112 as personal representative of the Estate of the Decedent. Any heir or other interested person may be entitled to appointment as personal representative or may object to the appointment of the personal representative. Unless objections are filed with the Court (pursuant to Minn. Stat. 524.3-607) and the Court otherwise orders, the personal representative has full power to administer the Estate including, after 30 days from the date of issuance of letters, the power to sell, encumber, lease or distribute real estate.
Any objections to the appointment of the Personal Representative must be filed with this Court and will be heard by the Court after the filing of an appropriate petition and proper notice of hearing.
Notice is also given that (subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801) all creditors having claims against the Estate are required to present the claims to the personal representative or to the Court Administrator within four months after the date of this Notice or the claims will be barred.
Dated: April 10, 2015
/s/ Peggy Zdon,
Registrar
/s/ Lori Meyer,
Court Administrator
Attorney for Personal Representative
Adam J. Rohne
Hansen, Dordell, Bradt, Odlaug & Bradt, PLLP
3900 Northwoods Drive, Suite 250
St. Paul, MN, 55112
Attorney License No: 392430
Telephone: (651) 332-8734
FAX: (651) 482-8909
Email: arohne@hdbob.com
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
380341

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Novak Carol http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/novak-carol/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/novak-carol/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:25:34 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158039 NOTICE OF INFORMAL PROBATE OF WILL AND INFORMAL APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
DISTRICT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
PROBATE COURT DIVISION
Court File No.: 02-PR-15-207
In Re: Estate of Carol I. Novak,
aka Carol Irene Novak,
Decedent.
Notice is given that an Application for Informal Probate of Will and Informal Appointment of Personal Representative was filed with the Registrar, along with a Will dated April 25, 2005. The Registrar accepted the Application and appointed Richard M. Novak, whose address is 16663 Ward Lake Drive, Andover, MN 55304, to serve as the Personal Representative of the decedents estate.
Any heir, devisee or other interested person may be entitled to appointment as Personal Representative or may object to the appointment of the Personal Representative. Any objection to the appointment of the Personal Representative must be filed with the Court, and any properly filed objection will be heard by the Court after notice is provided to interested persons of the date of hearing on the objection. Unless objections are filed, and unless the Court orders otherwise, the Personal Representative has the full power to administer the estate, including, after thirty (30) days from the issuance of Letters Testamentary, the power to sell, encumber, lease, or distribute any interest in real estate owned by the decedent.
Notice is further given that, subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801, all creditors having claims against the decedents estate are required to present the claims to the Personal Representative or to the Court within four (4) months after the date of this notice or the claims will be barred.
Dated: April 13, 2015
By: /s/ Peggy Zdon
Registrar
Lori Meyer
Court Administrator
GRIES LENHARDT
MICHENFELDER ALLEN, P.L.L.P.
Jill M. Presseller
MN #248277
12725 43rd Street NE #201
St. Michael, MN 55376
Telephone: (763) 497-3099
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
380333

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McCann http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/mccann/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/mccann/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:25:30 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158037 NOTICE OF INFORMAL APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS (INTESTATE)
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
DISTRICT COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Court File No. 02-PR-15-204
Estate of
Pamela Jean Schroeder McCann
Notice is given that an application for informal appointment of personal representative has been filed with the Registrar. No will has been presented for probate. The application has been granted.
Notice is also given that the Registrar has informally appointed Alison A. Schmitz, whose address is 757 -131st Avenue, Blaine, MIST 55434 as personal representative of the Estate of the Decedent Any heir or other interested person may be entitled to appointment as personal representative or may object to the appointment of the personal representative. Unless objections are filed with the Court (pursuant to Minn. Stat. 524.3-607) and the Court otherwise orders, the personal representative has full power to administer the Estate including, after 30 days for the date of issuance of letters, the power to sell, encumber, lease or distribute real estate.
Any objections to the probate of the Will or appointment of the Personal Representative must be filed with this Court and will be heard by the Court after the filing of an appropriate petition and proper notice of hearing.
Notice is also given that (subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801) all creditors having claims against the Estate are required to present the claims to the personal representative or to the Court Administrator within four months after the date of this Notice or the claims will be barred.
Dated: April 10, 2015
/s/ Peggy Zdon,
Registrar
/s/ Lori Meyer,
Court Administrator
Attorney for Personal Representative
Stephen P. Radtke
Radtke Law Offices, P.A.
1700 W Highway 36, Suite 200
Roseville, MN 55113
Attorney License No: 028774X
Telephone: 651-633-7529
FAX: 651-633-1929
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
380270

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Gilstead Jacqueline http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/gilstead-jacqueline/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/gilstead-jacqueline/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:25:26 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158035 NOTICE OF INFORMAL APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
DISTRICT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
Court File No.:02-PR-15-210
In Re: Estate of
Jacqueline M. Gilstead,
a/k/a Jacqueline Marie Gilstead,
Jacqueline Gilstead, Jackie Marie Gilstead, Jackie M. Gilstead, and Jackie Gilstead
Decedent.
Notice is given that an Application for Informal Appointment of Personal Representative was filed with the Registrar. The Registrar accepted the application and appointed Melissa A. Gilstead, whose address is 1525 41st Avenue N.E., Columbia Heights, MN 55421, to serve as the personal representative of the decedents estate.
Any heir or other interested person may be entitled to appointment as personal representative or may object to the appointment of the personal representative. Any objection to the appointment of the personal representative must be filed with the Court, and any properly filed objection will be heard by the Court after notice is provided to interested persons of the date of hearing on the objection.
Unless objections are filed, and unless the Court orders otherwise, the personal representative has the full power to administer the estate, including/after thirty (30) days from the issuance of letters of general administration, the power to sell, encumber, lease, or distribute any interest in real estate owned by the decedent.
Notice is further given that, subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801, all creditors having claims against the decedents estate are required to present the claims to the personal representative or to the Court within four (4) months after the date of this notice or the claims will be barred.
Dated: April 14, 2015
/s/ Peggy Zdon
Registrar
Lori Meyer
Court Administrator
ROBERT J. BEUGEN, LTD.
Robert J. Beugen, MN#8011
941 Hillwind Road N.E.
Suite 100G Main Floor
Fridley, MN 55432
Telephone: 763-571-7730
Facsimile: 763-571-7741
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
380158

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Tweet http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/tweet/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/tweet/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:25:21 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158033 NOTICE OF INFORMAL APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS (INTESTATE)
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
DISTRICT COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
Court File No. 02-PR-15-200
Estate of
Allan Robert Tweet,
aka Allan R. Tweet
and Allan Tweet,
Decedent.
Notice is given that an application for informal appointment of Personal Representative has been filed with the Registrar. No will has been presented for probate. The application has been granted.
Notice is also given that the Registrar has informally appointed Linda C. Tweet whose address is 2316 -113th Avenue NW, Coon Rapids, MN 55433 as Personal Representative of the Estate of the Decedent. Any heir or other interested person maybe entitled to appointment as Personal Representative or may object to the appointment of the Personal Representative. Unless objections are filed with the Court (pursuant to Minn. Stat. 524.3-607) and the Court otherwise orders, the Personal Representative has full power to administer the Estate including, after 30 days from the date of issuance of letters, the power to sell, encumber, lease, or distribute real estate.
Any objections to the probate of the will or appointment of the Personal Representative must be filed with this Court and will be heard by the Court after the filing of an appropriate petition and proper notice of hearing.
Notice is also given that (subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801) all creditors having claims against the Estate are required to present the claims to the Personal Representative or to the Court Administrator within four months after the date of this Notice or the claims will be barred.
Dated: April 8, 2015
/s/ Peggy Zdon,
Registrar
/s/ Lori Meyer,
Court Administrator
Attorney for Applicant
William K. Goodrich
RANDALL, GOODRICH & HAAG, P.L.C.
2140 Fourth Avenue North
Anoka, MN 55303
Attorney License No. 36171
Telephone: 763-421-5424
FAX: 763-421-4213
E-mail: bgood@anokalaw.com
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
379513

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Bacigalupo http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/bacigalupo/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/04/24/bacigalupo/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 11:25:16 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=158031 NOTICE OF INFORMAL PROBATE OF WILL AND INFORMAL APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS
STATE OF MINNESOTA
COUNTY OF ANOKA
DISTRICT COURT
TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
Court File No.: 02-PR-15-197
In Re: Estate of
Harold Joseph Bacigalupo,
Decedent.
Notice is given that an Application for Informal Probate of Will and Informal Appointment of Personal Representative was filed with the Registrar, along with a Will dated February 25, 2015. The Registrar accepted the application and appointed Mark Bacigalupo, whose address is 3564 117th Lane NE, Blaine, Minnesota 55449, to serve as the personal representative of the decedents estate.
Any heir, devisee or other interested person may be entitled to appointment as personal representative or may object to the appointment of the personal representative. Any objection to the appointment of the personal representative must be filed with the Court, and any properly filed objection will be heard by the Court after notice is provided, to interested persons of the date of hearing on the objection.
Unless objections are filed, and unless the Court orders otherwise, the personal representative has the full power to administer the estate, including, after thirty (30) days from the issuance of letters testamentary, the power to sell, encumber, lease, or distribute any Interest In real estate owned by the decedent.
Notice is further given that, subject to Minn. Stat. 524.3-801, all creditors having claims against the decedents estate are required to present the claims to the personal representative or to the Court within four (4) months after the date of this notice or the claims will be barred.
Dated: April 8, 2015
/s/ Peggy Zdon
Registrar
Lori Meyer
Court Administrator
Craig A. Erickson (MN# 0027121)
Erickson & Wessman, PA
1300 NE Godward St.
Suite 1600
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55413
Telephone: (612) 465-0080
Facsimile: (612) 465-0084
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE
Published in the
Anoka County UnionHerald
April 24, May 1, 2015
379103

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