ABC Newspapers http://abcnewspapers.com Local News from The Anoka County Union, Blaine Spring Lake Park Life and The Coon Rapids Herald Sun, 02 Aug 2015 15:43:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Anoka County History: Civil rights vs. equal rights; same issue but different amendments http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/02/anoka-county-history-civil-rights-vs-equal-rights-same-issue-but-different-amendments/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/02/anoka-county-history-civil-rights-vs-equal-rights-same-issue-but-different-amendments/#comments Sun, 02 Aug 2015 15:43:50 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164270 The Civil Rights Amendment was passed in 1964, a full century after the Civil War. Like the Civil War, the effects were dramatic and brought changes to all Americans.

The Equal Rights Amendment never did pass. Proponents say it would have had significant effects on women. Opponents say it was an unnecessary rehash already covered by existing law.

The Civil Rights Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson this month in 1964, outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. It ended unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and by facilities that served the general public. Essentially, it meant that no state could deny anyone the rights due them by virtue of American citizenship.

Although women were not the intended target, the word “sex” was added to the Civil Rights Act by Howard W. Smith, a powerful Virginia Democrat who strongly opposed the legislation. Historians suspect it was a cynical attempt to defeat the bill and embarrass northern Democrats. Rep. Carl Elliott of Alabama later claimed, “Smith didn’t give a damn about women’s rights … he was trying to knock off votes either then or down the line because there was always a hard core of men who didn’t favor women’s rights.” The Congressional Record records that Smith was greeted by laughter when he introduced the amendment.

That view of the situation is not entirely fair. Smith was a friend of Alice Paul, the leader of the National Women’s Party, who had been a tireless worker for suffrage, finally achieving victory in 1920. She, together with Smith, authored several Equal Rights Amendments, beginning in 1945, but none were successful. Their failure is due in large part to the Judiciary Committee, which had refused for decades to even hold hearings on the measure.

The Equal Rights Amendment, (ERA) which was first proposed in Congress by the National Women’s Party in 1923, was not successful in Congress until 1972. It very simply stated, “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.”

Changing the Constitution is not easy — nor should it be. After Congress passes a proposed amendment, it requires ratification by three fourths of the state legislatures (38 of 50) within seven years. The House approved the ERA in 1970, and the Senate did likewise in 1972. Thirty of the necessary 38 states ratified the amendment by 1973.

But then came a highly organized, determined opposition, led by Phyllis Schlafly. She opened her speaking engagements with, “I’d like to thank my husband for letting me be here tonight.” Schlafly argued that the ERA would hurt women by destroying protective measures like alimony, while laws against sexual assault would be swept away, as would the courts’ tendency to give child custody to the mother in a divorce case. She predicted that women would be drafted into the military and forced to share public rest rooms with men. Stop-ERA advocates baked apple pies for the Illinois legislature while they debated the amendment. They hung “Don’t draft me” signs on baby girls. The strategy worked. By 1982, the year of expiration, only 35 states had voted in favor of the ERA — three states shy of the necessary total.

On a personal note, in 1972 I was forced to quit my job with Anoka-Hennepin schools when I became pregnant with my first son. In 1976, when my second son came along, I was not. In 1972 the district paid for family insurance coverage for men, but only for women who were “head of household.” That too was changed about the same time.

Maria King is a member of the Anoka County Historical Society.

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/02/anoka-county-history-civil-rights-vs-equal-rights-same-issue-but-different-amendments/feed/ 0
Farmer of 102-year-old Ramsey family farm wins award http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/02/farmer-of-102-year-old-ramsey-family-farm-wins-award/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/02/farmer-of-102-year-old-ramsey-family-farm-wins-award/#comments Sun, 02 Aug 2015 12:26:38 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164258 It’s been about 20 years since Bruce Bacon subjected his soils to mechanical cultivation.

Bruce Bacon owns Garden Farme in Ramsey, which was founded in 1913 by his great grandparents. The University of Minnesota Extension Services named it the 2015 Farm Family for Anoka County. Photos by Eric Hagen
Bruce Bacon owns Garden Farme in Ramsey, which was founded in 1913 by his great grandparents. The University of Minnesota Extension Services named it the 2015 Farm Family for Anoka County. Photos by Eric Hagen

Through his own experience and attending seminars led by soil scientists, the 75-year-old Ramsey farmer does everything by hand with the help of interns and workers. There are no chemicals sprayed to kill pests. He uses rotting bales of hay that farmers can no longer feed to livestock and uses aged manure to provide the fertilizer his plants need to grow. He said the  diversity and placement of the plants allows nature to balance itself.

The University of Minnesota Extension Service awarded Bacon’s Garden Farme (7363 175th Ave. NW, Ramsey) the title of 2015 Farm Family for Anoka County. Bacon will receive the award Aug. 6 at Farmfest near Redwood Falls.

“It means that my effort and my understanding that informed my effort are becoming a more familiar understanding thanks in large part to science that’s made accessible to the people,” Bacon said.

This 102-year-old, 90-acre family farm produces culinary herbs and specialty leafy greens used by more than 10 local restaurants and caterers. The farm also produces nuts, mushrooms, fruit and honey.

There is a permaculture garden which emphasizes sustainable gardening that relies on water retention and plants re-seeding to cut down on back-breaking labor. Garden Farme has also been an organic certified production farm since 1977.

Bruce Bacon has used fallen oak and ash trees to build a couple of buildings on his farm property, just another way he recycles what nature gives him.
Bruce Bacon has used fallen oak and ash trees to build a couple of buildings on his farm property, just another way he recycles what nature gives him.

Perennial crops such as rhubarb and horseradish line the exteriors of the garden beds because it attracts tree frogs, salamanders and other types of predators of insects, Bacon said. He likes planting sunflowers because it attracts birds to eat the insects and the birds will help spread the seeds to grow more sunflowers.

Each garden bed at Garden Farme measures 33 inches by 33 feet so it is easy to access the middle of the bed while walking on the paths that adjoin each bed. The spacing also makes it easy to move manure and mulch. The depth of each garden bed is 10 inches. A few inches of manure are added to the bottoms of the beds each fall and filled with rotting hay up to the top of the beds to keep the edges from slumping. Mulching can also occur after it snows to trap moisture.

When spring temperatures are warm enough, Bacon pulls the mulch off the beds for a few days and allows the soil to warm up before planting. He does not believe in mechanical or regular tillage because it buries a potential seed crop and can lose the soil organic matter that helps the plants grow.

“Rather than the soil chemistry, I focused on the soil biology,” Bacon said. He credits this as the reason the University of Minnesota Extension is giving him this award.

Sustainability goes beyond the garden. Since moving to the farm in 1970, Bacon has been slowly building a couple of other buildings with the wood from fallen oak and ash trees on his property. Those buildings house his offices and spare bedrooms for employees who choose to stay at the farm.

Groups frequently visit Garden Farme to learn about Bacon’s techniques. He has become quite the host. He even built an outdoor brick pizza oven. The past Sunday, he hosted the North Country Herbalist Guild for an all-day forage for herbs and a picnic.

Becoming a farmer

Farming is in Bacon’s family’s blood. His great grandparents Elizabeth Ann (Keillor) and Benjamin Herbert Crandall bought 40 acres in northern Ramsey in October 1913, which already had a four-year-old house and barn on it.

The crops they grew and the dairy cows they managed helped provide subsistence to this family with eight kids. Their son Joe would become the second generation owner and the farm has always remained in the family.

But Bacon was not always planning to be a farmer. He grew up in Anoka. His father, John, was a dentist. His mother, Dorothy, was a secretary and bookkeeper for a couple of Anoka companies and worked at the Anoka County Courthouse for a short time.

After the Russians sent the satellite Sputnik into space and America was trying to catch up in the space race, Bacon received an engineering scholarship and attended the University of Minnesota before coming to the conclusion that this field was not for him.

He left Minnesota to enroll at the University of Oregon where he obtained his bachelor’s degree in anthropology in 1964. For three summers, he worked on a wheat farm in eastern Oregon.

He became a graduate student and studied anthropology and American studies at Oregon and then the University of Minnesota. He left school in 1968 before earning a masters degree because he was ready for a break from school. He took a couple of part-time jobs before moving to the farm in 1970

Garden Farme hosts many groups, so Bruce Bacon recently built an outdoor brick pizza oven.
Garden Farme hosts many groups, so Bruce Bacon recently built an outdoor brick pizza oven.

As he was looking to find himself in the tumultuous 1960s, he became involved with the Students for a Democratic Society and joined numerous protests dating back to 1965. He joined the march on the Pentagon in October 1967.

His father was a gun collector and taught him how to shoot. Bacon only went hunting once.

“I shot one deer and it didn’t die. I looked at its face and its big brown eyes and I thought, ‘What did I just do?’” he said.

While in school, he read a book first published in 1923 called “Absentee Ownership and Business Enterprise in Recent Times: The Case of America” by Thorstein Veblen. He said it influenced him so much that he named his first son Thorstein.

A chapter titled “The Independent Farmer” touches on the danger of “massive vested interests that move obscurely in the background” controlling the market by deciding what it can bear and setting prices. A section of the book talks about how farmers buying from Sears Roebuck magazines rather than the small businesses hurt the local economy.

A shirt Bacon wears with the words “Food not Lawns” illustrates his belief that Americans need to be more “food independent” by having their own gardens rather than solely relying on the grocery store.

But Bacon said people cannot just start up a garden on their own without doing the research first. His success in working with local restaurants and co-ops is based on years of trial and error.

With his uncle Joe Crandall being 80 years old and unable to care for the farm anymore, Bacon moved onto the farm in 1970 and began running the operations as he settled down with a family. He married Catherine in 1971 and their sons Thorstein and Justin were born in 1972 and 1973 respectively.

Farming was not his only job. From 1978 to 2007, Bacon worked part-time for the city of Ramsey as tree inspector, fire warden and environmental specialist.

“My half-time income supported my half-time gardening,” he said.

Bacon is still hard at work at the age of 75, but does feel dizzy at times and his joints ache, he said. He is only five years away from the age his uncle Joe was before he moved to the farm in 1970 so coming up with a succession plan has been on his mind.

Bacon does not envision his sons taking over the farm. Thorstein is a jeweler and Justin works in the IT field. He may set up a land trust or a cooperative for the 90-acre farm.

“The question about what the succession plan is for the family farm in the most pressing topic for me right now. I would like to keep it in production, so what will be the means to do that?” Bacon said.

eric.hagen@ecm-inc.com

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/02/farmer-of-102-year-old-ramsey-family-farm-wins-award/feed/ 0
Contract awarded for portion of Bunker Hills renovation work http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/02/contract-awarded-for-portion-of-bunker-hills-renovation-work/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/02/contract-awarded-for-portion-of-bunker-hills-renovation-work/#comments Sun, 02 Aug 2015 12:24:22 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164256 A contract was awarded by the Coon Rapids City Council July 21 to address kitchen equipment needs at the Bunker Hills Golf Course Clubhouse bar and grill as well as kitchen equipment for the remodeling and expansion project now under way at the clubhouse.

The bid from Premier Restaurant Equipment Co., which was approved by the council on a 6-0 vote with Council Member Steve Wells absent, totaled $235,923.10.

According to Sharon Legg, city finance director, Premier Restaurant Equipment is known to shop for demo, scratch-or-dent or used equipment offering good warranties and that would lower the cost from that included in the bid.

The bid was split into three packages: outdoor area, kitchen and bar, and furniture.

When the council approved the budget June 16 for the remodeling project, it included furniture, equipment and art as well as additional equipment needed to replace either broken, missing or other small-ware equipment in the main kitchen to increase efficiency and the food quality of the operation, Legg told the council.

The cost of the outdoor area and furniture bid packages will come from the $668,000 budget approved by the council in June for the entire renovation project.

As stated then, the cost of the kitchen and bar area package, $89,729.45, to replace broken or missing equipment in the existing kitchen, will be paid from the restaurant operations budget, which is part of the city’s golf course enterprise fund.

The council July 21 authorized $100,000 from the restaurant operations budget for this expenditure.

The renovation project approved by the council last month on a 5-2 vote, with Council Members Wade Demmer and Brad Johnson opposed, is designed to enhance the restaurant and bar operation, which the city now operates through a management contract with Morrissey Hospitality Companies.

When the council brought in Morrissey Hospitality to run the Bunker Hills restaurant, bar and event center for the city in November 2014, it was an entirely new business model.

Before, the city had leased out the restaurant, bar and event center to a vendor, who was supposed to pay the city a monthly rent, but had not been doing so, and had also lost the ability to purchase liquor for the facility because it had not been paying the state sales tax.

Two areas of the clubhouse are being remodeled under the plan approved June 16:

–Expansion of the bar and restaurant area by removing the existing walls between the bar and adjoining conference rooms will add 98 seats to the current 138-seat bar and restaurant. The cost is $286,000 with a 10 percent contingency.

–A new outside bar and grill, open during the golf season specifically for golfers, will provide 89 seats in the simulator room and outside patio for customers to have breakfast, lunch and dinner at lower prices without having to use the dining room. The cost is $300,000 with a 10 percent contingency.

Figures provided to the council by Legg and Keith Riordan of MHC project net revenues of $26,000 per year from the renovated bar and restaurant area and $41,000 a year from the new golfer bar and grill.

With these projections, the payback period for the restaurant and bar improvement would be 12 years and for the golfer bar and grill nine years, but neither included financing costs, Legg said.

The $668,000 budget approved by the council included not only the renovations, but also $52,000 for architect and design fees already incurred as well as a construction management fee.

The project is being financed through an internal city loan via the revolving construction fund, which derives it revenues from special assessments paid on street projects, with interest equivalent to taxable bonds sold payable over 10 years, to be paid back from the golf course enterprise fund, according to Legg.

“The restaurant is expected to lose money in 2015 primarily due to transition and repositioning,” Legg told the council. “Staff expects a significant reduction in 2016 losses, but the operation will likely need support.

“However, these investments will help to ensure long-term profitability due to efficiencies, quality enhancements and the ability to leverage the existing investment.”

According to Tim Anderson, Bunker Hills golf professional, work is moving forward on the project – walls have been taken down in the bar and grill, and cement has been poured for the new, seasonal outside bar and grill.

The goal is to complete the project before several large corporate events take place in the later part of August, Legg said.

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/02/contract-awarded-for-portion-of-bunker-hills-renovation-work/feed/ 0
Night to Unite returns Aug. 4 http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/night-to-unite-returns-aug-4/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/night-to-unite-returns-aug-4/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 22:00:34 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164360 Across Minnesota, Night to Unite block parties bring neighbors together the first Tuesday in August annually.

Hundreds of celebrations are planned across Anoka County Aug. 4.

Ramsey firefighter Jim Grega lets Phengzong Thao turn on the fire truck’s siren during Night to Unite in 2014. Communities across Minnesota hold block parties annually to connect with one another and public safety agencies. File photo by Eric Hagen
Ramsey firefighter Jim Grega lets Phengzong Thao turn on the fire truck’s siren during Night to Unite in 2014. Communities across Minnesota hold block parties annually to connect with one another and public safety agencies. File photo by Eric Hagen

Organized by public safety agencies, Night to Unite aims to build community, which, in turn, creates safer environments.

“These things are for neighbors getting to know neighbors and protecting each other,” said Sgt. Eric Peterson of the Anoka Police Department.

Children have a chance to explore ambulances, squad cars and fire trucks when medical professionals, deputies, police officers and firefighters pay visits to parties around the county.

Adults can have more serious dialogue about how to keep an eye out for suspicious activity and work together to keep neighborhoods safe.

For more information about Night to Unite and parties in your area, contact your local police department.

olivia.alveshere@ecm-inc.com

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/night-to-unite-returns-aug-4/feed/ 0
Parking lot expansion at Sand Creek School http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/parking-lot-expansion-at-sand-creek-school/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/parking-lot-expansion-at-sand-creek-school/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 19:00:28 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164376 A site plan to expand parking at Sand Creek Elementary School was approved by the Coon Rapids Planning Commission July 16.

Under the plan, the school will reconfigure the existing parking lot on Olive Street and construct 41 new parking spaces to increase the capacity of the parking lot to 135 spaces.

According to Planner Scott Harlicker, the expansion will take place in the area between the two parking lot access points on Olive where there is an existing stand of small spruce trees, which will have to be removed.

But the plan, which proposes a 5-foot setback from Olive Street, does not meet the minimum 20-foot setback requirement, Harlicker told the commission.

The school will need a setback variance from the Coon Rapids Board of Adjustment and Appeals, which will meet Aug. 6 to consider the request.

If the variance is denied, the site plan will become void as the variance is a condition of approval, Harlicker said.

On the recommendation of Harlicker, the commission also required more landscaping as part of its site plan approval.

While the school’s landscaping plan includes a hedge between the parking spaces and Olive Street and the planting of 14 maple trees along the sidewalk on the west side of the main drive aisle, Harlicker said city code requires more trees – five new overstory trees on Olive, two on the parking lot island and one each on each side of the peninsulas – and the new landscaped areas have to be irrigated.

Added parking on-site will mean there will be less on-street parking on Olive Street and 121st Avenue, especially during school events, according to Harlicker.

“The project will not increase traffic on Olive Street,” Harlicker said. “The parking lot expansion will provide needed parking for those currently using the facility.”

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/parking-lot-expansion-at-sand-creek-school/feed/ 0
UnionHerald Looking Back for July 31 http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/unionherald-looking-back-for-july-31/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/unionherald-looking-back-for-july-31/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 18:38:56 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164268 Is it wise?

Last week the fire department was called out by the ignition of gasolene at the house of C. Karker. Mrs. Karker’s life was in jeopardy and it is said she would have been burned to death but for Mrs. Harris. An alarm was sent to the telephone office and there happened to be no one at the fire department barn, so Mrs. Harris of the telephone office went to Geo. Frauman’s store and told him of the fire. The bell was struck and it developed that one city fire team was in the Rhona gravel pit, with a load of gravel on the wagon. The other was a long ways from the engine house. About 10 minutes elapsed before the teams could be put in use for fire service. When the firemen arrived at the Karker home the blaze had been extinguished; and they were ridiculed openly by people. “You have a fire department. If you only had some way to get to a fire.” Is it good policy to have both teams away from the engine house in the day time? The Union believes it is not.

-100 years ago, Aug. 4,1915
Anoka County Union

Anoka Drum Corps kept busy

The Anoka Fife and Drum Corps took part in three parades during the Minneapolis Aquatennial. Also this coming Sunday they will march and play in the Robbinsdale Jubilee parade in the afternoon. In the evening the drum corps will go to North St. Paul where they will also march and play for celebrations. The boys are consistently doing a splendid job of advertising Anoka to the neighboring communities.

– 75 years ago, July 31, 1940
Anoka Herald

Burchett home bombed

Authorities today are still investigating the Friday night bombing of a Coon Rapids home. The bomb, planted against the home of Mr. and Mrs. Dale Burchett on Zilla, exploded about 10:20 p.m. Mr. and Mrs. Burchett were upstairs at the time of the explosion. Fortunately, no one was injured.

– 50 years ago, July 30, 1965
Coon Rapids Herald

Downtown Anoka not dying

Contrary to public perception, the downtown Anoka district is not idly becoming a ghost town, said Peter Turok, executive vice president of the Anoka Chamber of Commerce. “The area has been going through change for quite some time. It started when stores like Target came in. Is it depressing? Sure it is, but it’s part of the change. Anoka is alive. Anoka is well. The premature deaths are greatly exaggerated,” Turok said.

– 25 years ago, Aug. 3, 1990
Anoka County Union

• Compiled by Sue Austreng

Editor’s note: “Looking Back” is reprinted exactly as the items first appeared.

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/unionherald-looking-back-for-july-31/feed/ 0
Developer interested in former gas station property http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/developer-interested-in-former-gas-station-property/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/developer-interested-in-former-gas-station-property/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 16:00:56 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164373 A Sauk Rapids developer is interested in buying a property in the city of Andover, potentially for an office development, according to Andover’s city administrator.

A representative for Inventure Properties, LLC, could not be reached before this edition went to press, but ABC Newspapers spoke with City Administrator Jim Dickinson and Mayor Julie Trude on this developing story.

According to Dickinson and Trude, Inventure Properties is interested in the former Stop-N-Shop gas station site on the northeast corner of Bunker Lake Boulevard and Crosstown Drive.

Recent office building projects for this Inventure include constructing the Viking Electric Supply building in Waite Park and the Vantage Point Campus in Sartell. It also recently renovated the old Bank of St. Cloud building.

Dickinson said it appears this will be an office development, but the Andover Economic Development Authority has yet to see a specific proposal. At this point, the city is only starting to negotiate with an interested buyer.

The Molly Professional Center across the street from this site would be a good model to follow, Trude said, adding that it could include some commercial tenants as well.

“I’m really excited for this redevelopment,” Trude said. “I think we will have a building in the ground next year and they will improve the whole area.”

Andover bought the 1.4-acre property Dec. 31, 2012, for $430,000 from Mardot Properties, LLC. The main tenant for this owner was Stop-N-Shop but a tanning salon and a Youth First Community of Promise drop-in center were also located at the site.

The building was demolished in June 2013 and has been on the market ever since.

While waiting for a buyer to bite on this property, the city continued to watch listings to see if any neighboring properties went up for sale so the city could buy it and assemble more land for a larger redevelopment of the area.

“There’s got to be willing sellers,” Dickinson said. “We’re not there yet. We’re not going to harass them. It’s a marathon, not a sprint.”

Trude said her biggest concern is making sure the parking lots between this development and future developments to the east would be connected to provide better traffic flow rather than vehicles needing to get back onto Bunker Lake Boulevard which has a median in this area.

“We don’t own anything else so it’s hard to have that big picture,” Trude said. “We have a vacant site. I want to get it on the tax roll and I’d like to see it developed as soon as possible.”

eric.hagen@ecm-inc.com

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/developer-interested-in-former-gas-station-property/feed/ 0
Anoka gearing up for another all-class reunion http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/anoka-gearing-up-for-another-all-class-reunion/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/anoka-gearing-up-for-another-all-class-reunion/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 13:00:42 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164209 Plans are coming together for the upcoming All Class Anoka High School Reunion. The reunion, which will be held alongside Anoka Halloween celebrations, is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 24.

The gathering will take place 8 p.m. to midnight Oct. 24 on Jackson Street between Second and Third avenues.

Anoka High School alumni Al Springer (left) and Jeff Sampson at Anoka Riverfest in their official 2015 all-class reunion T-shirts. Photo by Mandy Moran Froemming
Anoka High School alumni Al Springer (left) and Jeff Sampson at Anoka Riverfest in their official 2015 all-class reunion T-shirts. Photo by Mandy Moran Froemming

The reunion will be held immediately following the Light up the Night parade and headquartered in the Anoka Halloween heated tent on Jackson Street.

Signs will be posted on Jackson, guiding reunion-goers to gather with classmates.

There will also be an afternoon reunion for seniors from 1-4 p.m. in the heated reunion tent, also on Saturday, Oct. 24. Refreshments will be provided, along with music by Tom Ward’s Riverfest Jazz Ensemble. This gathering early in the day is a new addition from the first all-class reunion, which was held in 2012.

According to organizers, Anoka High School has the most graduates of any high school in the state – 40,675.

Ross Omdahl, one of the reunion’s organizers, has compiled the number of graduates from year to year in the high school’s 135-year history.

The Class of 1881 had eight graduates, and graduating class totals crept into the double digits a decade later and cracked 100 in 1940.

The largest group was the Class of 1989 with 944 graduates.

Commemorative T-shirts promoting the reunion are on sale and starting Monday, Aug. 3, will be available at Anoka Sports Shack and the Anoka Area Chamber of Commerce office. T-shirt sales are the only source of funding for the reunion, which is free to attend.

For more information, visit the Anoka High School All Class Reunion’s Facebook page.

mandy.froemming@ecm-inc.com

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/anoka-gearing-up-for-another-all-class-reunion/feed/ 0
Outdoors: Hot weather crappies http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/outdoors-hot-weather-crappies/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/outdoors-hot-weather-crappies/#comments Sat, 01 Aug 2015 10:17:04 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164222 There is no doubt the hot summer months of July and August are a real challenge to many of us walleye anglers, but we have other
alternatives during these hot months to chase other species such as largemouth bass, northern pike and of course, crappies.

Crappies are abundant and widespread in the vast majority of our lakes here in central Minnesota and we have many options to choose from.
Here are some crappie chasing idea’s to assist you in your quest.

No Rules
The first thing to remember is that there are no hard and fast rules regarding crappie fishing in the heat of summer.

Midsummer is prime time for chasing suspended schools of crappies. Submitted photo
Midsummer is prime time for chasing suspended schools of crappies.
Submitted photo

What I mean by that is every lake is different and I fish each lake according to it’s own characteristics. Crappies inhabit all these lakes but behave and congregate in different depths and habitats. I treat each crappie lake on a case-by-case basis.

Water Temperatures
Crappies, just like other species have a tendency to drop to depths that provide the most comfort and dissolved oxygen. Again, depending on the lake, this could be anywhere from 5 feet to 55 feet. On many lakes in central Minnesota there is enough dissolved oxygen around 5 feet but nothing deeper than that.

There is a wonderful clue that tells you exactly the depth you should be fishing. Water temperatures have been holding in the middle 70’s for quite some time and this has kept the crappies widespread at many depths. This can also change if we continue to get extreme heat into August.

Suspended Fish
I spend a great deal of time during midsummer by using my electronics to scan deep water and locate suspended schools of crappies. Many of the deep lakes in central Minnesota have populations of crappies that typically suspend at this time of the year and are easy to locate if you know where to look. These fish often inhabit the deeper basins and will suspend usually half way up from some of the deepest areas.

This means if you have water depths of 45 feet in an area, look for those fish about half way up or around 22 to 26 feet. Commonly they are almost always half way up from the deepest area. Use your electronics to scan the deep water and look for the telltale “hooks” on your screen.

If you have the color red inside those hooks those are good sized fish.

Presentations
I keep a couple of rods pre-rigged at this time of the year in my boat with suspended crappie lures at the ready. One is a minnow imitator lure that is really an ice fishing lure. It is a fake minnow with hooks on the end and swims in circles when dropped down. A great lure for dropping right smack into the suspended schools. Another option is a slip bobber and plastic minnow. With the bobber option, you can set the depth on the knot and drop the plastic minnow right into the school at the exact depth you see on your electronics.

Steve Carey is an outdoors columnist for ABC Newspapers

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/08/01/outdoors-hot-weather-crappies/feed/ 0
Virtues Campus opens book in Coon Rapids church http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/virtues-campus-opens-book-in-coon-rapids-church/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/virtues-campus-opens-book-in-coon-rapids-church/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 22:30:02 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164197 Longing to help students “have faith in their education” the Rev. David Glesne decided to start a college that brings the university and the church together.

“The first American colleges grew up out of the church – Harvard, Yale, all of those. And they educated our leaders, shaped our society, formed our values. I want to re-establish the church as the center for the community, to bring the university and the church together,” said Glesne, a Lutheran minister who spent the last 20 years serving Redeemer Lutheran Church in Coon Rapids and in Fridley.

Virtues Campus President David Glesne steps outside the Coon Rapids facility located inside Redeemer Lutheran Church, 2135 Northdale Blvd., Coon Rapids. Photo by Sue Austreng
Virtues Campus President David Glesne steps outside the Coon Rapids facility located inside Redeemer Lutheran Church, 2135 Northdale Blvd., Coon Rapids. Photo by Sue Austreng

After much prayer and consideration and responding to what he felt was a divine call, Glesne left his pastoral position and founded The Virtues Campus in August 2014.

Rethinking education with character, truth and integrity, The Virtues Campus offers students an affordable, Biblically-integrated liberal arts education on two pilot campuses beginning this fall. The Coon Rapids Virtues Campus is located inside Redeemer Lutheran Church (2135 Northdale Blvd., Coon Rapids). The second pilot campus is housed inside Spirit of the Lord Church (1001 Penn Ave. N, Minneapolis).

Under the mentorship and guidance of a trained academic pastor at each campus, students enrolled at Virtues take online courses offered through its partner university (Waldorf College in Forest City, Iowa) and meet together at their local host church campus.

“It’s a hybrid of online education and on-campus education. That’s our big niche: an online education with a campus experience,” said Glesne.

“This gives students the freedom of a flexible study schedule while allowing them to enjoy a campus experience where they collaborate on academic projects with their peers, participate in career-readiness activities, and study how God’s Word is applied to learning and living,” Glesne said.

The two-year traditional student program (targeted at students age 18-24) has students meeting together on campus on Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings each week.

Inside the Coon Rapids Virtues Campus location, David Glesne relaxes in the student lounge. Photo by Sue Austreng
Inside the Coon Rapids Virtues Campus location, David Glesne relaxes in the student lounge. Photo by Sue Austreng

The two-year adult evening program is set up so that those students meet on campus one night each week.

At The Virtues Campus, while working toward an Associate of Arts degree (or a Bachelor of Arts degree if an Associates has already been achieved) every student’s education includes Bible lessons, courses in truth and application of the Bible, career discovery, community service and internships.

Glesne said the cost for an education at The Virtues Campus is less than $10,000 per year.

“That’s because Waldorf – our partner university – is very excited about this and wants to help make this happen. They’ve also said if a student gets their Associate of Arts degree with Virtues and follows with their education at Waldorf and is active in student ministry or community service, they will give them a $25,000 scholarship,” Glesne said.

After the 2015-2016 pilot year, Glesne and his board of trustees expect growth of The Virtues Campus to continue in Minnesota during the 2016-2017 academic year and nationally the following year.

“Our desire is to build a Christian world view into the next generation, provide a compass of truth and direction for life,” Glesne said.

“If the Lord is willing and we can begin a revolution in education, it will begin right here,” he said.

To apply to The Virtues Campus, visit VirtuesCampus.com or call 651-401-1045.

Application deadline for the 2015-2016 academic year is Aug. 12. Classes begin Sept. 9.

Sue.Austreng@ecm-inc.com

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/virtues-campus-opens-book-in-coon-rapids-church/feed/ 0
Mille Lacs Band to suspend netting in 2016; Dayton listens to lake community’s concerns about Mille Lacs fishery http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/mille-lacs-band-to-suspend-netting-in-2016-dayton-listens-to-lake-communitys-concerns-about-mille-lacs-fishery/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/mille-lacs-band-to-suspend-netting-in-2016-dayton-listens-to-lake-communitys-concerns-about-mille-lacs-fishery/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 22:09:46 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164518  

Jeffrey Hage

Times Editor

jeff.hage@ecm-inc.com

 

ISLE — The Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe is doing its part to improve the health of the walleye population on Lake Mille Lacs.

Gov. Mark Dayton announced Friday, July 31, that the Band has agreed to forego netting for walleye on the lake in 2016. The announcement was made during a July 31 town meeting at Isle High School on the southeast corner of the lake. Dayton called the roundtable so he could personally address concerns of Lake Mille Lacs area resort owners, fishing guides, sportsmen, residents and business owners following a Minnesota DNR announcement July 21 that the lake was within 3,000 pounds of reaching its 2015 walleye harvest numbers and walleye fishing could be shut down for the year.

The news from Dayton drew a standing ovation from the estimated 300 people in attendance at the listening session.

Dayton told the crowd that about 20 minutes before the Isle meeting he had spoken with Melanie Benjamin, chief executive of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe. He said she had met with Band elders, who made the decision to hold off on netting by tribal members in 2016, he said. He added that the decision only affects netting by the Mille Lacs Band, not the other seven tribes that have fishing rights on the lake because of an 1837 treaty.

The Band came forward with the offer, Dayton said. It was nothing that his office asked for. He was clear to point out that the move was not part of any “deal” that his office brokered.

“I did not ask for this. It came as a wonderful surprise,” Dayton said.

The Band issued a statement early Friday afternoon.

“The Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe remains deeply committed to safeguarding the long-term health of Mille Lacs Lake and ensuring the region’s economy continues to grow and prosper, including businesses that rely on the lake.

“As Governor Dayton and legislative leaders develop a plan to help the region, the Mille Lacs Band will continue to promote the region through the DoTheLake campaign and other marketing efforts to drive additional tourism to the region. The Mille Lacs Band Department of Natural Resources and Environment will continue to work closely with the Minnesota DNR, the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission and other stakeholders to protect the lake for future generations.

“There are no quick solutions to fixing Mille Lacs Lake, but the Mille Lacs Band is committed to restoring the lake. Our people made our home here hundreds of years ago and we intend to preserve this lake for generations to come. We look forward to partnering with the Governor to support his efforts to address the immediate and long-term challenges of the region.”

Dayton’s visit to Isle came after representatives of the Mille Lacs Area Tourism Board visited the Governor’s office on Wednesday, July 29. That meeting came on the heels of a July 23 meeting at McQuoid’s Inn between DNR officials and members of the public to discuss the potential closing of the fishery.

Karen McQuoid, of Mac’s Twin Bay Resort, a member of the lake area tourism board, started the meeting off by recapping the July 29 meeting with Dayton in St. Paul. The group told the story of the “state of the lake” from the eyes of residents, business owners and launch captains.

“We explained that we are passionate about our Mille Lacs fishery and our businesses. Mille Lacs is not only a Minnesota treasure, it’s home to hundreds of families, family cabins, and a popular retirement destination,” McQuoid said.

“All of us want this fishery to survive,” she said.

The tourism group and Dayton discussed the impact on businesses and homeowners and disputed the DNR’s assessment that the lake is in a state of crisis, she said.

The group made a handful of requests to Dayton and his staff, McQuoid said, including keeping the walleye fishery open with catch and release for the remainder of the 2015 fishing season, keeping ice fishing open without catch and release this upcoming winter and to grant economic relief for the area. The group also asked for long-term solutions and no more Band-Aid fixes, McQuoid said.

Dayton said he fully supported those measures.

“We need to do what we can to save the lake and turn it around,” Dayton said during the one-hour town meeting.

Dayton said he was going to establish an advisory committee to help him tackle issues related to ensuring the health of the lake.

Over the past week Dayton said he has come to realize that the current state of Lake Mille Lacs is a “tragic, tragic situation” and that work on restoring the walleye population needs to start immediately.

“We need to restore the lake to its former glory,” Dayton said, noting that the lake was once one of the top walleye destinations in the nation. Just three years ago the walleye harvest on Mille Lacs was 500,000 pounds and in 2015 its just 40,000.

Dickie Gadbois, owner of Dickie’s on Mille Lacs, said the walleye are biting real good this year and suggested that the quota on walleye was being nearly met because of a food shortage.

“We should take boats out and drop minnows and feed these fish now,” Gadbois said.

Linda Eno, owner of Twin Pines Resort on Mille Lacs in Garrison, told Dayton that a declining fishery is a process those on the lake have been dealing with for 20 years. She faulted the DNR for implementing management plans that didn’t work and failing to change those plans.

“They’ve been asleep at the wheel,” Eno said.

Joe Fellegy, a former fishing guide, launch operator, son of Mille Lacs resort owners and a newspaper fishing columnist, told Dayton that 90 percent of fisherman who once fished the lake have been scared off by quotas, size limits and other DNR policy. “The negative impacts of public policy far outweigh the benefits,” he said.

He also said that Mille Lacs has suffered the biggest public relations fiasco in Minnesota fishing history.

“Mille Lacs Lives Matter,” Fellegy told Dayton. “The treaty fishery, Mille Lacs style, has to go,” he said.

Jim Derosa of Jim DeRosa’s Guide Service in Isle, said everyone in the school’s auditorium agrees on one thing – that Mille Lacs could be the best lake in Minnesota.

He noted that the most recent issue of BassMasters magazine ranked Mille Lacs as the 10th best bass lake in the United States.

“Take out large mouth only, and its No. 5,” he said.

DeRosa said he hopes the DNR manages the lake in a way that it looks at it as a world-class lake for bass and not a stop-gap fish to catch until the health of the walleye fishery improves.

He also invited Dayton to go out on his boat and fish the lake with him.

But Dayton warned Derosa that he was a fish repellent and DeRosa would be taking a big chance by going out with him.

“Besides, I would trade all the walleye in the world for one big muskie,” Dayton said kiddingly.

John Odell, owner of the Last Resort on the west side of Mille Lacs, reminded Dayton that the lives of people who reside and work on the lake depend on the decisions he will help make in the next few weeks. Odell said that he has already had 15 cancellations for August and September in the past two weeks.

Jack Dunn, who said he was a guide on the lake for 16 years, is now out of work because of the downturn of the lake.

“We need to work together like five fingers on a hand and bring back the lake. Then maybe I can come back to work,” he said.

 

 

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/mille-lacs-band-to-suspend-netting-in-2016-dayton-listens-to-lake-communitys-concerns-about-mille-lacs-fishery/feed/ 0
Bid package rejected for Sand Creek building http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/bid-package-rejected-for-sand-creek-building/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/bid-package-rejected-for-sand-creek-building/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 20:30:43 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164183 A bid package for the construction of a 4,000-square-foot building in Sand Creek Park to house a concession stand, restrooms and warming house, plus a small maintenance facility, was rejected by the Coon Rapids City Council July 21.

The bid package was some $500,000 over the budget for the building phase of  the Sand Creek Park redevelopment project, according to Tim Himmer, city public works director.

The city hired Amcom to provide construction management services for the building project. It is in charge of the bidding process and will handle construction oversight, inspections and management of the project.

But the bid package, which comprised 32 separate contracts, totaled $1.573 million, and when other costs such a permit fees, inspection testing, construction management and 3 percent contingency were factored in, the total jumped to $1.776 million.

The city had estimated $1.2 million for the project, with funding coming from the city’s facilities construction account, Himmer told the council.

On Himmer’s recommendation, the council directed staff to rebid the project in early 2016 “when the building environment improves for this type of project,” he said.

At this time of the construction year, companies have a full workload of projects and in five of the contracts, there was only one bid received, according to Himmer.

At the beginning of the year, companies start scheduling the jobs on which they will bid, and a small project of this nature can fit in to the April, May and June time frame, Himmer said.

This delay won’t affect the completion of the overall Sand Creek Park project because of its extended nature and the pending roadway improvements at the entrance to the park on Northdale Boulevard, he said.

Himmer said the grading is almost complete and most of the site improvements are expected to be finished by the end of the 2015 construction season, even though the contract calls for a two-year time frame.

“The site improvements are ahead of schedule,” he said.

But amenities, such as equipment for the two playgrounds and the skate park, won’t be installed until next year, Himmer said.

They were bid under a separate contract, which was awarded by the council at the same time as the site improvements contract. These are being paid for from proceeds of the $17.4 million park bond referendum approved by voters in November 2013.

The only problem the city has run into so far has been the need for soil correction work in the southern end of the park where peaty soils were found, according to Himmer.

The site improvements under the contract include reconfiguration of six softball fields, two football and lacrosse fields, one hockey rink, an open skate area, additional parking, two playground areas, construction of two park shelters and a new trail system to access park amenities, plus a west trail loop, electricity for the reader board and dugout canopy structures.

Action by the council July 7 moved forward the third phase of the project.

By unanimous vote, the council approved a joint powers agreement with Anoka County for improvements and signalization of the intersection at Northdale and Redwood Street, which will become the main entrance to the renovated park.

The signalized intersection will improve access to the park and pedestrian safety, Himmer told the council.

Under the project, for which design work is 60 percent complete, Northdale and Redwood will be widened for right- and left-turn lanes on all four legs of the intersection. There will be some curb and gutter work, a traffic signal will be installed at the new entrance to the park, minor storm drainage as well as roadway mill and overlay work will take place,and a sidewalk will be constructed on the north side of Northdale extending west to the railroad tracks, according to Himmer.

Staff is currently working with residents on Northdale and Redwood to acquire all needed temporary and permanent easements for the project, while final plans and specification are expected to be completed this fall with construction scheduled to start in the spring of 2016, Himmer said.

The joint powers agreement, which will now go to the Anoka County Board for approval, spells out the scope of the project and the cost sharing between the city and county.

The preliminary construction estimate is $1.041 million, and under the county’s standard cost sharing agreement for traffic signal projects involving county and city roads (Northdale is a county highway), the city is responsible for 75 percent of the cost, or $760,035, Himmer said.

The city’s share will be paid for from eligible tax increment financing funds, he said.

According to Finance Director Sharon Legg, the city has earmarked some money in an existing tax increment financing pool for street projects.

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/bid-package-rejected-for-sand-creek-building/feed/ 0
2014 Annual TIF Disclosure http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/2014-annual-tif-disclosure-2/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/2014-annual-tif-disclosure-2/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 20:21:31 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164368 2014 Annual TIF Disclosure

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/2014-annual-tif-disclosure-2/feed/ 0
Ordinance No. 2015-02 Wetland Setbacks http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/ordinance-no-2015-02-wetland-setbacks/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/ordinance-no-2015-02-wetland-setbacks/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 19:58:23 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164365 Ordinance No. 2015-02 Wetland Setbacks

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/ordinance-no-2015-02-wetland-setbacks/feed/ 0
2014 Annual TIF Disclosure http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/2014-annual-tif-disclosure/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/2014-annual-tif-disclosure/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 19:55:41 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164362 2014 Annual TIF Disclosure

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/2014-annual-tif-disclosure/feed/ 0
Retiring Boomers: Change http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/retiring-boomers-change/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/retiring-boomers-change/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 19:30:02 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?guid=9fdc6e34d7a3a76249641316efc0c55a Are you one of the largest generation in American history? Comfortable with how much you have saved for retirement? Comfort is one thing, reality another, and boomers may be running of time to work on the financial quality of post-work life.

A recent study from the Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) surveyed 803 baby boomers ages 52 to 68 on expectations for retirement. I was shocked that the overall “economic satisfaction” for boomers dropped to a five-year low of 48%. I assume that the economic satisfaction they refer to equates to a financial comfort zone: enough savings and income for retirement.

Between 2011 and 2013, the satisfaction levels averaged 77% before falling to 65% in 2014. The numbers tanked 17 more percentage points this year, meaning that over half of America’s boomers are dissatisfied with their financial situation as they either prepare for or enter retirement.

Looking further, I found a glaring reason behind such gloom: As of this year, only five out of 10 boomer retirees surveyed have any savings, planning instead to rely completely on government benefits, pension income or both. About a third (34%) of respondents have $100,000 or more saved; only 19% maintain $250,000 or more saved for retirement.

According to my research for my book You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think, the tipping point for my happy retirees was $500,000 in liquid net worth (aka, retirement savings). Clearly, only a small fraction of boomers are at that point.

With such dismal nest eggs, what do all these retirees plan on for cash flow in the golden years? According to the IRI’s report, as of this year, half the boomers surveyed cited Social Security as a major expected source of income during retirement. Perhaps that’s why Get What’s Yours, a book on maximizing Social Security checks, holds a top spot on Amazon for retirement books.

While these statistics make me anxious, apparently boomers in general still aren’t worried about life after working. The study also gauged boomers’ retirement expectations compared with those of their parents and revealed that almost half those surveyed believed that financially they will be about as well off, even better off, than their parents in the later years.

About half also somehow imagined that enough dollars will remain in their retirement budget for basic expenses and some left over for travel and leisure. This tells me that too many boomers need a reality check.

The survey did contain some good news. The IRI looked into the retirement preparedness of boomers who work with financial advisors versus those who go at it alone. Those who worked with a financial advisor were almost twice as likely to have at least $100,000 saved.

Those who worked with an advisor seem more conscious of retirement savings. Another good rule of thumb I learned from my research: Spend at least five hours a year planning for your future retirement. Rather than guessing, ignoring or hoping your retirement will be better than your parents’, put in the time planning.

Ultimately, boomers need more realistic expectations for post-work life – and, if they don’t like that reality, a strategy to change their future. With that generation as with all others, it’s up to all of us individually to make retirement work.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Wes Moss, CFP, is the chief investment strategist for Capital Investment Advisors and a partner at Wela, both in Atlanta. He hosts “Money Matters,” a live financial advice show on Atlanta’s News 95-5 and AM 750 WSB Radio. In 2015 and 2014 Barron’s Magazine named him as one of America’s top 1,200 Financial Advisors. His newly released book, You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think published by McGraw Hill, is available on Amazon, iTunes and at your local bookstore.

Wes writes weekly about personal finance in the “Bargain Hunter Section” for AJC.com, the site of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Wes is also the editor and writer for About.com’s Personal Finance blog. Connect with Wes on Twitter at @WesMoss365 and on Facebook at Wes Moss Money Matters. You can also visit his website, WesMoss.com to learn more about Wes, and take his complimentary Money and Happiness Quiz.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 
]]>
Are you one of the largest generation in American history? Comfortable with how much you have saved for retirement? Comfort is one thing, reality another, and boomers may be running of time to work on the financial quality of post-work life.

A recent study from the Insured Retirement Institute (IRI) surveyed 803 baby boomers ages 52 to 68 on expectations for retirement. I was shocked that the overall “economic satisfaction” for boomers dropped to a five-year low of 48%. I assume that the economic satisfaction they refer to equates to a financial comfort zone: enough savings and income for retirement.

Between 2011 and 2013, the satisfaction levels averaged 77% before falling to 65% in 2014. The numbers tanked 17 more percentage points this year, meaning that over half of America’s boomers are dissatisfied with their financial situation as they either prepare for or enter retirement.

Looking further, I found a glaring reason behind such gloom: As of this year, only five out of 10 boomer retirees surveyed have any savings, planning instead to rely completely on government benefits, pension income or both. About a third (34%) of respondents have $100,000 or more saved; only 19% maintain $250,000 or more saved for retirement.

According to my research for my book You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think, the tipping point for my happy retirees was $500,000 in liquid net worth (aka, retirement savings). Clearly, only a small fraction of boomers are at that point.

With such dismal nest eggs, what do all these retirees plan on for cash flow in the golden years? According to the IRI’s report, as of this year, half the boomers surveyed cited Social Security as a major expected source of income during retirement. Perhaps that’s why Get What’s Yours, a book on maximizing Social Security checks, holds a top spot on Amazon for retirement books.

While these statistics make me anxious, apparently boomers in general still aren’t worried about life after working. The study also gauged boomers’ retirement expectations compared with those of their parents and revealed that almost half those surveyed believed that financially they will be about as well off, even better off, than their parents in the later years.

About half also somehow imagined that enough dollars will remain in their retirement budget for basic expenses and some left over for travel and leisure. This tells me that too many boomers need a reality check.

The survey did contain some good news. The IRI looked into the retirement preparedness of boomers who work with financial advisors versus those who go at it alone. Those who worked with a financial advisor were almost twice as likely to have at least $100,000 saved.

Those who worked with an advisor seem more conscious of retirement savings. Another good rule of thumb I learned from my research: Spend at least five hours a year planning for your future retirement. Rather than guessing, ignoring or hoping your retirement will be better than your parents’, put in the time planning.

Ultimately, boomers need more realistic expectations for post-work life – and, if they don’t like that reality, a strategy to change their future. With that generation as with all others, it’s up to all of us individually to make retirement work.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Wes Moss, CFP, is the chief investment strategist for Capital Investment Advisors and a partner at Wela, both in Atlanta. He hosts “Money Matters,” a live financial advice show on Atlanta’s News 95-5 and AM 750 WSB Radio. In 2015 and 2014 Barron’s Magazine named him as one of America’s top 1,200 Financial Advisors. His newly released book, You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think published by McGraw Hill, is available on Amazon, iTunes and at your local bookstore.

Wes writes weekly about personal finance in the “Bargain Hunter Section” for AJC.com, the site of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Wes is also the editor and writer for About.com’s Personal Finance blog. Connect with Wes on Twitter at @WesMoss365 and on Facebook at Wes Moss Money Matters. You can also visit his website, WesMoss.com to learn more about Wes, and take his complimentary Money and Happiness Quiz.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 
]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/retiring-boomers-change/feed/ 0
Life crime briefs from the July, 31, 2015, edition http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/life-crime-briefs-from-the-july-31-2015/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/life-crime-briefs-from-the-july-31-2015/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 18:30:05 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164207 St. Francis man convicted of second-degree burglary

Randy Thomas Vaught, 34, was convicted of two counts of felony second-degree burglary and fleeing police in Anoka County District Court July 22.

In March, Vaught, of St. Francis, stole a toolbox and a number of electronics from a Coon Rapids home in the 13000 block of Yukon Street.

A search of Vaught’s home revealed the stolen items, according to the criminal complaint.

The next month, after burglarizing a Blaine home in the 1800 block of 130th Lane, Vaught led police on a high-speed chase through Blaine, Ham Lake and Andover April 15.

He fled west on Bunker Lake Boulevard through Ham Lake and into Andover, at one point reaching speeds greater than 110 mph, a second criminal complaint states.

Near the Bunker Lake and Hanson boulevards intersection, Vaught rammed his truck into the back of a vehicle, which hit another vehicle, containing a mother and her 2-year-old daughter, head-on, according to Cmdr. Paul Sommer of the Anoka County Sheriff’s Office.

The driver of the vehicle that was rear-ended complained of back pain, the mother had a sprained shoulder and the child had a scrape from making contact with her car seat.

Driving south on Hanson Boulevard, Vaught was surrounded by squad cars and crashed his vehicle near the sheriff’s office in Andover.

Five vehicles belonging to both sheriff’s office deputies and Blaine police officers were damaged in the chase.

A Blaine police officer sustained injuries to his chest when his abdomen slammed into his steering wheel, according to the complaint.

Inside Vaught’s truck, authorities found several items stolen from the Blaine home.

For his crimes, Vaught was sentenced to 45 months in prison with credit for 99 days served. He will pay at least $500 in restitution, with the possibility of more.

~ Olivia Alveshere and Eric Hagen

Blaine man charged with stealing from Lowe’s, Herberger’s

Damien Robert Graham, 42, of Blaine, was arraigned in Anoka County District Court July 10 on felony theft and receiving stolen property charges.

When Graham left Lowe’s in Blaine with two chainsaws July 3, an employee asked him for a receipt, but he kept walking, got into his car and drove away, according to the criminal complaint.

The chainsaws represent a $700 loss to Lowe’s, the complaint states.

Graham pawned the chainsaws at We Pay More Pawn in Blaine for $80 and $120, respectively, according to automated pawn records, the complaint states.

Five days later, officers responded to Herberger’s in Northtown Mall after a Graham allegedly attempted to steal two coffee makers, according to the complaint.

He was detained and left in a vehicle with the same license plate as the vehicle in the Lowe’s theft, the complaint alleges.

When police attempted to recover the stolen items from We Pay More Pawn, Graham was seen in the vehicle, the complaint states.

He admitted to taking the chainsaws from Lowe’s and pawning them to support his heroin habit, the complaint states.

      ~ Olivia Alveshere

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/life-crime-briefs-from-the-july-31-2015/feed/ 0
Palmer to miss 3M Championship weekend http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/palmer-to-miss-3m-championship-weekend/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/palmer-to-miss-3m-championship-weekend/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 17:55:51 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164497 Golf legend Arnold Palmer will not take part in Saturday’s Great’s of Golf event at the 3M Championship as originally scheduled.

Palmer, 85, called Executive Tournament Director Hollis Cavner Thursday from his home in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, to say he wasn’t able to make what’s been an annual trip for 21 of the 22 previous 3M Championships.

Palmer returned from a busy couple weeks in Great Britain where he not only took part in several events during the week leading up to The Open Championship at St. Andrews but looked at a course he’s designing.

“He got tired over there and they really packed together the week, doing all those events,” Cavner said. He’s tired and maybe a little under the weather and he called [Thursday] and said, ‘Hey look. I need to rest up.’ I said, ‘Stay home, boss. You’ve taken care of us forever.’ I told him I’d be over for his birthday party,” Cavner added, referring to Palmer’s 86the birthday, in late September.

Cavner hosted an annual pre-tournament dinner with several of the Great’s of Golf at his home in Blaine where he broke the news.

“We’re going to miss him. Last night, the Greats were all disappointed because they don’t get together often and its a special treat when they get together,” he said.

Palmer was the 1961 and 1962 Open champion and participated in the Champions Challenge charity event July 15 along with many former champions at St. Andrews. Palmer made only his second swing of theyear in Britain, the first being the ceremonial tee shot along with Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player in April at Augusta.

Palmer is recovering from a shoulder injury that required surgery after tripping over his dog, Mulligan. “So he hasn’t been able to rehab like he’s wanted to,” Cavner said. “He just needs to rest up, nothing serious, he just needs the rest.
“We’re going to miss him dearly, though.”

Walking through the locker room, Cavner said he was glad to see how disappointed the other players were. “It takes you feel good when guys like Billy Andrade and the other guys in the event say they wanted to see him,” he said.

Saturday’s Greats of Golf Challenge will tee off at 11:50 a.m. and include several notables playing on four teams including Jack Nicklaus, Gary Player and Lee Trevino on the Team Greatest Ever; Annika Sorenstam, Nancy Lopez and Pat Bradley on Team LPGA; Fuzzy Zoeller, David Graham and Hale Irwin on Team January (captained by Don January) and Johnny Miller, Dave Stockton and Tom Weiskopf on Team Jacklin (captained by Tony Jacklin). Autograph sessions inside the Pioneer Press Expo Tent are from 9-11 a.m. and include the Greats of Golf plus Charles Coody, Al Geiberger, Jim Colbert and Bill Rogers.

jason.olson@ecm-inc.com

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/palmer-to-miss-3m-championship-weekend/feed/ 0
Warriors represent Coon Rapids, Andover at World Series http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/warriors-represent-coon-rapids-andover-at-world-series/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/warriors-represent-coon-rapids-andover-at-world-series/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:30:54 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164491 Coon Rapids will once again be represented at a Little League World Series.

The 13-year-old Warriors team, made up of players from the Coon Rapids Andover American Little League, not only captured the Minnesota title to reach the Central Region tournament but won the regional tournament in Kalamazoo, Michigan to qualify for the Intermediate (50/70 Division) World Series starting Sunday in Livermore, California.

Members of the Coon Rapids Andover American Little League pose with the Intermediate (50/70) Division Little League, Central Regional Championship banner in Kalamazoo, Michigan recently. Members pictured front row from left are: Gavin Wurst, Carter Anderson, Nolan Belschner, Xander Paar, Ryan Garlick, Joe Kopp; middle row: Wyatt Brenny, Benji Bruce, Nathan Culley, Jimmy Brinda, Matt Lewis, Alex Luckow and back row: Manager Steve Culley, coaches Robb Belschner and Randy Lewis. Submitted photo
Members of the Coon Rapids Andover American Little League pose with the Intermediate (50/70) Division Little League, Central Regional Championship banner in Kalamazoo, Michigan recently. Members pictured front row from left are: Gavin Wurst, Carter Anderson, Nolan Belschner, Xander Paar, Ryan Garlick, Joe Kopp; middle row: Wyatt Brenny, Benji Bruce, Nathan Culley, Jimmy Brinda, Matt Lewis, Alex Luckow and back row: Manager Steve Culley, coaches Robb Belschner and Randy Lewis. Submitted photo

To get from central Michigan to northern California, the team took an Amtrac train from Kalamazoo to Detroit Thursday where they caught an airplane to the west coast Friday. Little League picked up the travel and lodging expense for the players and coaches.

Minnesota faces Kawaihau Community Little League, Hawaii, representing the West Region in the world series opener at 5 p.m. central, August 2.

The other United States teams include tournament host California’s CA District 57; Wellington Little League, Florida (Southeast Division) and Northside Little League, Texas (Southwest). The East Region still has to be decided.

The International teams are: West Soul Little League, South Korea (Asia-Pacific); Southern Moravia Little League, Czech Republic (Europe-Africa); Elrod Hendricks West Little League, U.S. Virgin Islands (Latin America) and Miguel Luzunairis Little League, Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico).

If the Warriors win the opener; they play Southwest at 5 p.m. Monday, August 3; another win and they play at 8 p.m., August 5 in the U.S. Division semifinal.

The U.S. Championship will be 8 p.m. August 7 and the World Series championship is 8 p.m. August 8 and will be broadcast on ESPN.

Road to California

After winning the Minnesota title in Duluth, the Warriors headed to Michigan to face nine other state champions from the upper midwest July 25-30.

Minnesota held the only perfect record going 4-0 in the tournament, concluding with a 9-3 win over Illinois Wednesday after beating the same team 8-4 on Monday.

Minnesota opened the tournament with a 9-2 win over Michigan on July 24 and added a 13-3 win over Missouri on Sunday to reach the championship semifinal.

Warriors head coach Steve Culley told his team they might not have a team of superstars, but added “You’re all stars.”

The collective effort of the team is what has gotten them to this point, after being down 1-0 in a best-of-three series played in Duluth for the Minnesota title and a trip to Michigan.

“They’ve all contributed at one point or another and that’s what separates us,” Culley said. “We’re hitting from top to bottom.”

Against Illinois, the No. 5-9 batters in the line-up went a collective 0-for-15. In the regional opener against Michigan, Coon Rapids’ top four batters went 1-for-12 while the six-through-nine hitters got it done.

Catcher Joe Kopp is someone Culley has relied on not just for his play behind the plate or hitting, but as a dugout leader who plays an active role in keeping his teammates motivated. Either by a pat on the back after a second strike out or a high-five after driving in a run.

In the opener against Michigan, outfielder Alex Luckow made a crucial diving catch in the second inning to keep the game scoreless. Michigan ran out its top pitcher and Coon Rapids kept it 0-0 through four innings before rallying for the 9-2 win.

“Once we got that win we felt real confident in that we can do this,” Culley said.

Carter Anderson got the start in the opener and Nathan Culley came through with a couple innings of relief to preserve the lead. Culley also threw 93 pitches and struck out 11 in the championship win over Illinois. Nolan Belschner struck out four batters the final two innings of the championship.

“The camaraderie and chemistry on this team is special. It’s beyond words,” Culley said. During batting practice in Michigan, a half-dozen fathers shagged balls in the outfield and team mothers organized team meals and water during games.

“One dad calls it his big baseball family and that’s what’s so neat about this,” Culley said.

“Mentally, its surreal right now. I don’t know anyone dreamed we would get this far.”

He compared the run through the various levels of tournament play to a big cake to make it to the state-tournament level from regions. “Then we have a layer of icing on the cake winning state and add another layer of icing now. It still seems like we can’t wake up from a dream.”

Warriors code

The nickname for the Intermediate-level Little League ball club from Coon Rapids isn’t one that came to mind on a whim. Two years ago, Culley emphasized doing everything possible to keep the ball in front of them, being willing to sacrifice their body for the team.

“Being a warrior out there,” he said, adding batting with two strikes and taking the pitcher deep in the count as possible.

“Being a warrior at the plate and that just became their identity. Some teams are given their name, these boys earned theirs,” he said.

Another component to the nickname is what the coaches expect from the players.

“We also demand that they live by a code, we call it the warrior code, honoring God in all we do, living with honor and integrity on and off the field.”

jason.olson@ecm-inc.com

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/warriors-represent-coon-rapids-andover-at-world-series/feed/ 0
Graduate from Rasmussen College’s Blaine campus addresses students, veterans http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/graduate-from-rasmussen-colleges-blaine-campus-addresses-students-veterans/ http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/graduate-from-rasmussen-colleges-blaine-campus-addresses-students-veterans/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:30:40 +0000 http://abcnewspapers.com/?p=164202 Persistence. Resilience. Grit.

Those words describe and define Nicholas McNamara, according to Patty Sagert, campus director for Rasmussen College’s Blaine campus.

Since barely graduating from Centennial High School in 2003, McNamara went on to double his GPA at Rasmussen and represented 1,800 Twin Cities Rasmussen graduates, 243 from the Blaine campus, as their student speaker at commencement July 25, held at the Roy Wilkins Auditorium in St. Paul.

Nicholas McNamara, who studied at the Rasmussen College Blaine campus, represented 1,800 Twin Cities graduates as their student speaker July 25. Submitted photo
Nicholas McNamara, who studied at the Rasmussen College Blaine campus, represented 1,800 Twin Cities graduates as their student speaker July 25. Submitted photo

McNamara, 30, wanted to be the graduation speaker because “I have a story to tell, and the story’s about what veterans can accomplish when they get the right tools,” he said.

After high school, McNamara tried community college, but his heart wasn’t in it, he said. “I don’t think I made it to most classes.”

Joining the Marines turned his life around.

“The Marines took me from a punk kid who thought he was a class clown and made me into a man, a man who understood the importance of honor and discipline,” McNamara said in his graduation address.

McNamara served the United States for six years and was deployed overseas four times.

When he left service, it was difficult to reintegrate into civilian life, he said.

He was not able to find work that kept his finances in the black, and advancement opportunities with no bachelor’s degree were slim.

“I finally bought into the fact that I needed an education,” McNamara said.

He figured out what education benefits were available to him through the Post-9/11 GI Bill, and he set his sights on earning a degree in criminal justice from Rasmussen College.

With a growing family and a busy schedule, online courses seemed to make sense, but to take full advantage of benefits, he had to attend at least one class in person each term.

McNamara went from struggling alone to finding the “camaraderie and brotherhood” he used to know in the Marines, he said.

His classes were full of fellow veterans: About half of those enrolled in each of his courses at the Blaine campus had served in the military, he said.

In addition, “I fell in love with the staff,” he said.

When McNamara hit setbacks, staff and fellow students were there to pick him back up again.

When his second child was born, McNamara nearly lost his wife in childbirth. Their daughter Amelia, now 1, was very sick. The stress of it all got to McNamara, and he himself was hospitalized. A brush with cancer was another challenge for McNamara and his family.

“He pushed through it,” Sagert said. “His journey is pretty amazing.”

McNamara moved through college quickly and was able to graduate with his bachelor’s degree in under two years.

Rasmussen helped set him up with work as a contractor at Medtronic. He has since been hired full-time as a systems analyst.

He has already started working toward his Master of Business Administration degree at the University of Northwestern in St. Paul.

McNamara’s wife, Katelyn, is in her first term at Rasmussen following her husband’s tremendous success there.

The couple lives in Forest Lake with their children Lily, 3, and Amelia.

With his graduation speech, McNamara hoped to convey the importance of supporting veterans when they return home.

“Veterans can accomplish amazing things,” McNamara said. “(Rasmussen) can give you the tools to reintegrate into society.”

Rasmussen participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program and holds a number of events specifically targeted at veterans.

“It’s very important to us that we honor their service to our country,” Sagert said.

McNamara closed his address with a quote from Socrates: “Education is the kindling of a flame, not the filling of a vessel.”

“You started your journey at Rasmussen with a spark of hope; now it has been ignited,” McNamara said. “May you carry your torch for life.”

olivia.alveshere@ecm-inc.com

]]>
http://abcnewspapers.com/2015/07/31/graduate-from-rasmussen-colleges-blaine-campus-addresses-students-veterans/feed/ 0