june anderson

Every year the Anoka Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution honors a Woman in American History. She may be living or dead; a DAR member or not, famous or, as is often the case, a woman who doesn’t make the headlines, but works quietly behind the scenes making a positive difference in the lives of others.

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Every year the Anoka Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution honors a Woman in American History. She may be living or dead; a DAR member or not, famous or, as is often the case, a woman who doesn’t make the headlines, but works quietly behind the scenes making a positive difference in the lives of others.

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One of the joys of writing this column for the Anoka County UnionHerald on behalf of the Anoka County Historical Society are the occasional calls I get from readers telling me they have a story of historical interest to share. One such call came from an Anoka resident, Ardy Hoogestraat, whose family had owned and lived in the Sandy Beach Hotel on Lake George. Before meeting with Ardy I consulted Roe Giddings Chase’s “little booklet” written in 1906 describing the cabins and resorts on that lake in Oak Grove.

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Probably the last remaining testament to St. Francis’s importance as a milling town was the starch factory located on the east bank of the Rum River and the south side of Bridge Street, where the Anoka County Highway Maintenance Building now stands. By the late thirties and early forties it was no longer in the business of converting potatoes into starch.

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